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Market Street
kayes

[ Old Town ]
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name this coffeeshop
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Town Hall
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Leech Street
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Leech Street

kayes



Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
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· Date: July 15, 2008 · Views: 26862 ·
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kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
July 17, 2008 5:23pm

The Kong Heng coffeeshop is very popular with locals as well as visitors. There is a good variety of hawker fare. The one on left of pic, sometimes called "the house of mirrors" is just as popular. Both are located in Leech Street.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
July 25, 2008 9:23pm

Yes, Kong Heng and 'the house of mirrors' may be lacking in ambience but they more than make up with some of the best hawker food in town. For those who love street food, everything that is sold there is to die for!
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
August 12, 2008 7:19am

I wonder what happened to the Lam Meen stall in Kong Heng. Its not there anymore.Its a must for me whenever I go to this shop. One thing you need when you come here is to have earplugs as they take your order and shout out at the top of their voices.
wongfam

Registered: August 2008
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 19
August 18, 2008 9:28am

hey Joe,the original Lam Meen owner left many years ago for Hainan Island,he sold the business to a young couple whom I think left Ipoh.The original owner serves better Lam Meen and he did give them the original recipe but they didnt follow the recipe and make some short cuts.It didnt taste as nice but then thats my own personal opinion.Stan
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
August 18, 2008 10:30pm

Hi Stan,
I used to love the Lam Meen at this shop. Since its not there anymore, I've gone to another stall run by a guy named Paul and his wife in Ipoh Garden just opposite Wooleys. Its is at the end of the Hawkers Centre in front of the Bank Simpanan branch. Tastes good. Anyway, thanks for the info, Stan.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
November 9, 2008 8:08am

There used to be a restaurant in Old Town that's famous for its satay. Can't remember which street it was on, though. A few years ago, when I wrote a couple of articles about food for The Sunday Star, some readers sent me horror stories of unfinished satay sauce left behind by customers being re-used over and over by certain vendors. Since then, I've avoided eating satay.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
November 10, 2008 6:22am

Hi Phoebe, the satay stall was at the lane between the two coffeeshops and it was run by a Chinese guy. Back then, he would serve you a plate of satay and keep on refilling or replacing with freshly burned ones. After you have finished, he would count the number of sticks on the table and bill you for it. Could be that the satay thats already cold on the plate is taken away and replaced. Prob. his way of recycling it. Not sure if he did the same to his satay sauce. These days, they serve you only the amount that you order which is much cleaner. As for me, I prefer the Malay satay as its much tastier.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
November 10, 2008 8:15am

Thanks for the info, Joe. Yes, I do remember the Chinese satay-seller you described but simply could not recall where his stall was located. According to what my readers wrote, it was definitely the left-behind satay sauce they were referring to that was allegedly being poured back into the pot and re-used. Yikes.


Do you, by chance, know if there was an old small cinema in the vicinity that was closed in the late '50s or early '60s? I have this very, very vague memory of a small, pre-war, cinema nearby. I remember 'checking out' the building from the side one time in the early '60s when I was but a curious tyke after hearing someone saying that it was formerly a cinema.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
November 10, 2008 10:12am

Hi Phoebe,


I believe the old cinema is Choong Sun Cinema. Probably closed in the '60s. I also remember the Rojak Man who sold "Expensive Rojak" near this cinema. We need Joe to confirm that though.
By the way, the last time I corresponded with you were back in May 2002! through Ipoh Friends. Nice to hear from you.


ACS77
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 10, 2008 3:12pm

Can you remember the name of the road where Choong Sun Cinema was? Or give me a landmark near to it?
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
November 10, 2008 6:45pm

Hi Kayes, Phoebe and ACS 77, I think the old cinema you are refering to is now a furniture shop next to Kong Heng. It was said to be haunted. Back then, it used to have Chinese movies shown there. Not sure if it was burned down or demolished. It is just at the corner of Leech St/Station Rd. As for the expensive rojak, I'm not sure if it was rojak or 'Yau Yee Ong Choy' that was sold there. This guy used to sell his yau yee ong choy at Hale Street in front of the lawyers row under a tree. It was expensive but still drew crowds. That guy had an attitude problem.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
November 10, 2008 8:25pm

Hi ACS77 & Joe,
Joe is correct. The old cinema is not Choong Sun Cinema, which was the Chinese name for Sun Cinema. That pre-war movie theater was actually located next to Kong Heng, at the junction of Leech Street and Panglima Street. It was locked up and left vacant for a very long time, and was indeed reputed to be haunted. In front of this old theater, there was a very good Char Koay Teow stall. When I am in Old Town, I would sometimes order the koay teow and have it delivered to Kong Heng rather than eating outside by the stall because it is cooler to eat in a coffee shop, under the fan. Some folks from Old Town told me this low-rise structure was burnt down and another building was constructed in that location.


I remember the"Expensive Rojak" across from Sun Cinema very well. I was told the proprietor of that stall had passed away years ago and the recipe was 'inherited' by his nephew or relative. This younger rojak man had a stall in Lok Wooi Koi (at the junction of Clare St. & Anderson Rd.). When I was back home in Ipoh 2 years ago, a friend of mine brought me there and true enough, the rojak was really as good as the original stall. Joe, you are the man on the spot. Perhaps, you can verify whether this stall in Lok Wooi Koi is still in existence. I fully agree that the Sun Cinema rojak was ridiculously expensive. In the late 60's and 70's, a few of us could easily spend $25 or even $30 on rojak alone. Back then, hawker food was comparatively inexpensive but the old man would dare to charge $2.50 for a fairly small plate of freshly cut fruits and veggies. However, it was the special blend of haeko gravy that makes the rojak so unique. This stall on the 5-foot way was usually crowded even though the low tables and wobbly stools were very uncomfortable. What I like most was the rolls of aromatic sotong bakar which goes so well with the rojak gravy. Believe it or not, I have seen a Rolls Royce parked near the stall one day and someone was buying rojak for the royalty! These days, I make my own rojak and I usually have pre-mixed haeko gravy (loaded with peanuts and chili padi) in my fridge. Whenever I feel like having rojak, I'll just buy air jambu, jicama (bangkuang), seedless English cucumber, and pineapples, and presto! A rojak feast awaits me in no time. The local Malaysian restaurants serve pretty decent rjoak too, but I prefer my own concoction.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
November 10, 2008 9:42pm

Hi Ken & Joe,


Thanks for the correction. I know which building you are referring to. Did not know that it was a former cinema! There was a Char Koay Teow stall across the street from this old cinema and its a father and son business. Ken, I do not know if this is the same stall you are referring to.


Ken,


Looks like with all the Malaysia dishes that you can do and had learned from Ipoh Talk, you can open a Malaysian Restaurant in Chicago. I'll find an excuse from my company to pay a visit to my "customers in Chicago" area and try out your specialties. : )


ACS77
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 11, 2008 1:35am

hi all. does anyone know why that now demolished cinema was haunted? A ghost story always makes a good read. For example, in Batu Ferringhi, Penang there is an abandoned seaside bungalow that is haunted. Friends told me the ghost rides on a horse which gallops around the house.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 11, 2008 2:09am

That satay stall has been at that lane beside Kong Heng for a long time. When I was in 6th Form in the 60s, I used to go with a classmate, Stanley Kuppusamy, almost every Saturday to eat there. The stall sells pork satay and he has one type made from pig's intestines. Stanley loved the satay and he could eat more than 20 sticks at one go. As such he was a valued customer and the boss always treated us well. That chap could remember me for a long time and each time I went, he gave me a smile of recognition. Lately I have not seen him there. Instead a younger man is running the business who looks like his son.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 11, 2008 2:12am

And talking about the upstairs of Kong Heng, I read somewhere it used to house actors/actresses who performed Chinese operas/dramas. Do you think it is possible they performed at the now demolished cinema next door?
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
November 11, 2008 2:19am

Kayes, I'll try to enquire why that cinema was haunted from folks who told me so. Just for information, there was an incident where a lady died laughing in her seat while watching the movie 'Sor Tai Cheh'. Can't remember the seat number but folks would avoid taking that particular seat. Talking about haunted places, even St. Michaels was haunted as it was used by the Japs during their occupation. We used to hear lots of stories about ghosts there.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 11, 2008 2:44am

I am afraid one fine Sunday morning I might just die laughing in my chair while reading Jeremy Clarkson's column from the New Straits Times. His sense of humour is unique and some of his jokes can send me into fits of laughter. Anyway, it is always good to fall dead in front of my Mac and then have a virtual burial.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
November 11, 2008 3:46am

I remember the building next to Kong Heng, where the furniture shop is now located. I did not know it was a cinema. I think it was gutting by fire before it was torn down. The Sun cinema that I know is the one at the corner of Leech St and Brewster Rd [see photo # 398].


The coffeeshop across from the lane is called Tin Chun. I remember the lane pretty well and there used to be a good number of stores there. At the front was a wanton noddles seller. Behind this was two satay sellers in competition! Then comes the Chee Cheong Fun seller who is now in Tin Chun[see photo # 378]. If I remember correctly the Kangkong Cutterfish seller was also on the lane, now this seller has moved into Kong Heng. So was the popiah seller, which is also now in Kong Heng.


One of the satay sellers was a mom and son team and the other was the lenghty gentleman which some of you have described above. The mom and son team moved out or stopped selling in the 80s leaving the gentleman satay seller monopolising the two coffeeshops! I really enjoy the pork liver satays.....if I visit Tin Chun, this is something I will order. I do not find pork liver satays any where else. Are there other places where I can find pork liver satays?


The satay seller was pretty innovative in the 70s / 80s, where he will collaborate with the chee cheong fun seller, where you can get a plate of chee cheong fun with a few skewers of satays with peanut sauce poured over the satays on chee cheong fun! I do not think you can get this now. Perhaps it was the collaboration between the mom and son satay seller.


The char koay teow seller on the coffeeshop at the corner of Panglima St / Leech St used to be very popular and one has to wait a long while to get your order. His price is also more expensive compared to others and his portions are also smaller if I remember correctly. Is he the seller people nicknamed 'Spider Man'? or did I mixed him up with someone else?
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
November 11, 2008 4:16am

Hi Hokin, the char koay teow guy at the corner coffee shop is not 'Spiderman'. He has passed on a long time ago and his final place was in Fair Park in front of the tyre shop. This char koay teow guy you are refering to is known as Kum Fun or Golden noodles cos his prices are expensive. Not very tasty too.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 11, 2008 4:28am

Joe, this is the first time I heard of "Kum Fun". What a nice name Smile In the 70s, we used to have poker sessions at a friend's house and his wife would dash out to buy Spiderman's char kway teow from Fair Park to feed us.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
November 11, 2008 5:16am

Joe, thanks for clarifying. Now I remember....my mom used to call the char koay teow store as "Kam Wok Koi" [Golden Wok Lid]....I presume another variation to the same theme!
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
November 11, 2008 5:58am

Probably so, Hokin. There are many other stalls in Ipoh that serve better char koay tiau than this guy but I suppose it could be the locality of that shop.
Ken, there is a rojak stall in Lok Wooi Koi but I'm not sure if its the same guy. However, it tastes good.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
November 11, 2008 6:20am

Thanks, Joe/ACS77/Kayes/Ken/Hokin. Wow, one little humble query about a small, pre-war, 'nameless' cinema generated such an interesting flurry of responses overnight. Smile


I really have no idea where exactly this old 'nameless' cinema was located but I think it could be along Leech Street. I just have this vague recollection of having sat at a table outside this empty shoplot and sharing a bowl of ice kacang with my sister. I was probably 8 or 9 years old at that time. There were 2 street stalls in front of this boarded-up shoplot. One of them was a drinks stall but I can't remember what the other stall sold. Let me see what else I can dredge out of my dodgy memory. OK, the wooden building was painted green. It had an elevated frontage as in one had to climb 3 steps up from street level to get to the front entrance. I remember peering through gaps in the horizontal slats on the right side of the building. All I could make out in the dark was this huge, long vacant hall built below ground level.


ACS77,
I'm afraid I do not recognise your handle ("ACS77"). Maybe you could have corresponded with me using another handle or your actual name? Also, I was never ever on Ipoh Friends. The name of the group I founded in 2000 is Ipoh Alumni. Perhaps, you knew me from Ipoh Alumni? Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
November 12, 2008 11:25pm

Hi ACS77,
I am blushing beet-red because when it comes to cooking skills, I don't deserve any of those accolades you have heaped on me. Rojak is all I can whip up on my own. It's my wife who likes to dabble in the kitchen on weekends and I am merely the kitchen helper or 'kaki tagan' who does the heavy lifting whenever my services are needed. Making kuih or cooking curry is not a problem in a family kitchen but when it comes to stir fry or frying noodles, the heavy duty stoves in the restaurants are always superior in every way. It is hard to duplicate the aromatic taste or 'wok hei' (wok flavor) that comes from those big restaurant woks that are well and evenly heated all around by the powerful flames. About visiting Chicago, it is best to bear in mind that the midwestern winter can be rather intimidating. In fact, Chicago is a tale of two cities during the warm and cold seasons. In the summer it is a colorful and vibrant city that is pulsating with energy. During the winter months, it is not dead, but becomes much more subdue because many outdoor activities are put on hold, subjected to the unpredictable whims of Mother Nature. By the way, how is Banana Leave Malaysian Restaurant in San Jose? Is it any good?
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
November 15, 2008 4:01pm

Hi Phoebe,


You did find my name. I guess I was communicating with you thru Ipoh Alumni.


Hi Ken,


You are being modest. The kaki tangan usually whips up surprising stuff that they had observed through the years. As for "wok hei", I am still trying to explain to my caucasian friends : )
I know what you mean by the drastic weather in Chicago. We are going to my in-laws in Wichita for Thanksgiving. The weather may not be as extreme as Chicago but still colder than California : )
By the way, Happy Thanksgiving to you and all at New Ipoh Talk Forum.


ACS77
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
November 15, 2008 9:36pm

Hi ACS77,
Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours too! Most Chicagoans, both young and old alike, always complain about the weather. Yet when they are away, they tend to reminisce about the much reviled weather, no matter how extreme it is. Last year, we celebrated Christmas in Australia and New Year in New Zealand and believe me, we really missed the cold weather we have been complaining about. Being creatures of habit, celebrating the year-end holidays in summer seems almost unreal and we long for the pristine tranquility of a white christmas. Counting down to the New Year in foreign country has a different ring to it too. Suddenly, we felt that braving the bone-chilling winds to welcome the New Year with roaring fireworks along the shores of Lake Michigan is not so bad after all. I guess human nature is rather ironical sometimes, we do miss those things we complain about. Once again, happy Thanksgiving to everyone!


Ken
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
November 16, 2008 5:01am

Kayes,I read with interest your tale of a Haunted Bungalow in Batu Ferringhi,whilst not pretending to be a believer,of such things,would this Bungalow be about 200 metres from the road,toward the sea and on an area of land with no other buildings around it,??
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
November 16, 2008 5:17am

Jim, I think you just described the Catholic Retreat for nuns which of course was never haunted. That bungalow has since been sold. The haunted bungalow I am referring to is actually built on a slope right from the roadside. You just drive your car off the road and you are in the porch of that house. Many years ago I stopped there a couple of times at night and waited a while to see if I could hear horses galloping. Being involved in horse racing for such a long time, if I had heard those galloping sounds, I would have been able to determine what kind of horse it was .... for example, whether it was a show horse or a race horse. This will be useful information to add to that ghost story.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
November 16, 2008 5:42am

Kayes,Show Horse,Racehorse just so long as you back the Winner,Ghost or not as long as the winnings are real
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
November 16, 2008 6:43am

Hi, ACS77.


Yes, I found your name but not through Ipoh Alumni. Just a wee bit of sleuthing is all. Please check your private message box (at the top left of page) AFTER logging in. Smile
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 8:05pm

This coffee shop is just a block away from Kong Heng. I like the curry mee here. How's the coffee?


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/currym.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 8:36pm

This is one of the side walls of the Kong Heng Coffee Shop. I would say the building needs a restoration job real soon.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/kongheng.jpg
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
December 30, 2008 8:47pm

Kayes, this picture above made my heart race just then as soon as I laid eyes on it. I had these mental images flashing through my head because it really reminded me of the side of that old cinema I mentioned earlier.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 9:03pm

Phoebe, the old cinema you mentioned was right next to Kong Heng, according to Joe. In this pic it would be on the extreme right, where the furniture shop is now. Very likely that old cinema had the same architecture as the Kong Heng building and that's why you remember the walls.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/cinema2.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 9:14pm

Here's another pic. That old cinema was burnt down and the building now housing the furniture shop was built recently.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/cinema3.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 9:17pm

The exact spot where that old cinema was.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/cinema4.jpg
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
December 30, 2008 9:50pm

Kayes, thanks for these later photos. I think Joe's right about this furniture shop having been built on the grounds of the demolished old cinema. Still can't quite get over how that other picture with those windows set my mind off like that.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
December 30, 2008 10:01pm

Phoebe, as I said, it was very likely the old cinema had the same kind of architecture as the Kong Heng building. How I wish I can find an old pic of that cinema! Anyone has one?
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
February 12, 2009 9:39pm

Just window watching Smile


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/windowkh10.jpg
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 13, 2009 2:13am

I will give 100 marks for that - no more or no less!! Smile
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
May 19, 2009 7:23pm

Hi Kayes
There has been a lot of speculation about the old building that was next to Kong Heng. That building has been long since demolished and now a single storey building sits in its place. I made some enquiries about the building and finally found somebody who could tell me what it was. My friend told me it was not a cinema but an Opera house and it was owned by the Eu Tong Sen family. He attended operas there when he was a boy but because he went with the Eu family, they sat in the family box. Hence he could not tell me what the sitting was like downstairs. So you were correct to say, Kayes, that you read opera actors/actresses stayed upstairs of Kong Heng as they performed next door. I wish I could find a pic of that opera house as I can still see it so clearly in my mind's eye.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
May 31, 2009 4:51am

Hi blue grass,
That was an interesting piece on the opera house and before it was demolished, there was a very good Char Koay Teow stall right in front of it. At that time, the building was boarded-up and the tables were positioned along the sidewalk and inside the shallow front foyer. There place was dusty and dirty, and there were even rumors that the building was haunted. Well, when the food is good, who cares! Compared to Penang and Melaka, Ipoh is not so richly layered in history and traditions, but I am sure many of the old buildings do have interesting stories that are begging to be told. It would be great if some historians can share of their insights with us, so that we can know more about our hometown's storied past.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
May 21, 2012 7:36am

Hi Ken
I have wonderful news about Kong Heng. It has been transformed into a boutique hotel and beautifully done too. Looking at the facade you would never imagine the work that had been done behind it. A whole new block has been added behind Kong Heng with flights of stairs connecting the two buildings. The walls have been cleaned up and left as they are. Immediately above the coffee shop are the rooms on either side of the long corridor. The top floor is one big room that has two hanging 'rooms' with glass walls! The bathrooms have glass walls naturally!!
In the other building, behind Kong Heng is one big family room with again glass walls but with sheer curtains if you need a little privacy. All very interesting, wouldn't you agree?
I will go take pics for you as soon as I can. This is just to wet your 'appetite/curiosity.' Cheers!
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
May 21, 2012 7:42am

You are right about the delicious Char koay Teow in the old opera house, Ken. My school friends and I ate there often when we had to stay back for extra classes. We also heard about the ghosts in the opera house but that didn't deter us either.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
May 22, 2012 3:29pm

Hi Blue Grass,
It's great to hear from you again after a long period of silence. Hope all is well with you and your family. Boutique hotels seem to be the 'in' thing in our hometown these days. I can't help but wonder how are these Ipoh hotels when compared to the boutique establishments in Penang and Melaka. Price wise, are they more expensive than the modern and brand new hotels? I was in Barcelona two summers ago and we stayed at a hotel in the main tourist boulevard that fits your description of the refurbished Kong Heng. The facade wears its original age gracefully but the interior is spanking new. In fact, many of the classical pre-war heritage buildings in downtown Chicago are also refurbished in the same manner, with its facade intact but the interior is fully modernized and updated.


The old opera house does conjure eerie feelings but nothing can detract us from the famous Char Koay Teow. I have never felt the presence of any paranormal activities but an encounter with centipedes in that building left a deep impression in my mind. Once, while I was enjoying my plate of piping hot koay teow, the skies suddenly darkened with storm clouds looming in the horizon. Before I could finish my food, sheets of tropical monsoon rain were slashing down with unabated ferocity. To escape from the drenching rain, my friend and I had to move our table into the inner foyer. The water level in the drains were rising and we noticed hordes of centipedes crawling towards higher ground to escape from the flood waters. It was quite a sight and we had to stand on our chairs for fear of being bitten by these creepy crawlies.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
May 23, 2012 6:13am

Hi Ken
My family and I are well, thanks for inquiring. It has certainly been ages since I last posted anything. But I am glad to be back as it gives me much pleasure to to talk and reminisce about Ipoh - its history, people and buildings and of course food. Aren't we fortunate we can do all this at Ipoh Talk! I enjoy keeping you and the others up to date with happenings here in Ipoh. Cheers Ken.



I was very tickled to read about the centipedes joining you for Char Koay Teow many years ago. They were certainly uninvited guests.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
June 4, 2012 12:06am

Hi Ken
I was in the vicinity of Kong Heng recently and although I did not have the time to take photos inside the building, I managed to take a few of the exterior. I will go again but in the meantime have a look at these few. I will send them to Kayes soon.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,824
August 23, 2019 3:32pm

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