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Brewster Road
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namkew
Anderson Road

kayes



Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
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Junction of Anderson Road and Leong Sin Nam Street.
· Date: November 5, 2009 · Views: 16528 ·
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Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
November 5, 2009 9:05pm

Every corner shop in Ipoh is or used to be a coffee shop. I think the Ipoh Old Town White Coffee Cafes are following this concept but with their distinctive dark coat of paint and dim interiors.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 30, 2010 3:58am

This Nam Kiew shop is the place I mentioned regarding the fried noodles. The new guy running the Tai Chow stall at the back portion of Nam Kiew seems to be doing very well. BTW have you noticed that the word 'Kap Tai Fun' is mainly used in Ipoh and is practically unheard of in other places. Over here in KL, its either Kong Fu Chow or Fookeen Chow while in Penang, its Hokkien Char or otherwise. In Ipoh, the 'Kap Tai' comes with meat, prawns, liver and intestines and not forgetting the good ol' Chee Yau Char.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
May 30, 2010 7:23am

Hi Joe,


In Ipoh, Laksa is Assam Laksa and Curry Mee is noodles with curry. But in KL, Curry Mee is called "Curry Laksa". When I was new in KL, many a time I had to eat the "wrong" noodles I ordered. Smile Same with Hokkien Mee, in Penang Prawn Mee is called Hokkien Mee. Whereas in KL, Hokkien Mee is Tai Lok Meen or Foo Kian Chow in Cantonese. Very confusing indeed .....
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 30, 2010 8:31pm

Hi Orange,
Another thing baffles me. I'm so used to ordering 'Char Seet' or Iced Chinese Tea in Ipoh but here in KL, when I say 'Char Seet', they give me a puzzled look. So I got used to saying 'Seet Char' which they understood. C'mon!!! Whats the difference? Its the same thing. Smile Anyway I guess we have to 'Do as the Romans do' kinda thing. I'm sure Ken will have experienced such things and esp. in US, certain places call 'Calamari' while others say 'Squid'. Smile
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
May 30, 2010 11:29pm

Hi Joe,
Perhaps it is because the term Calamari conjures up a better image than Squid.Just as Escargot and Padi Chicken
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 31, 2010 5:54am

Hi Jim,
You're right about this. Another thing would be eggplant vs brinjals and also ladies fingers vs okra.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
May 31, 2010 6:00am

Hi Joe
Even the way we count our cents are different in KL and Ipoh! It is 'yut kok' in KL and 'yut chen' in Ipoh! I can't remember but do we refer to $ in the same way?
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 31, 2010 7:14am

Hi Blue grass,
Over in Ipoh, they say 'Yut Mun' for one ringgit while in KL, they say 'Yut Khow' and in Penang which is Hokkien, it is 'Chi Khor'. If you go to some Hakka speaking area, they will say 'It Kheau'. A bit confusing isn't it? Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
May 31, 2010 7:41am

In Ipoh, it's 'Ngg Cheen' but in KL it's 'Ngg Kok'. I'm sure Ken will say it's 'Ngg Hho Chi'. Right, Ken? Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
May 31, 2010 11:18am

Hi Joe, Blue Grass, Orange & Jim,
When Shakespeare wrote that 'a rose by any other name is still a rose', we can bet that 'Tai Lok Meen' still taste just as good no matter what name it goes by. But you folks are correct. The different terminology used in different places can be confusing and unknowingly, one may order one thing and end up getting another. I had my fair share of hilarious confusion when I first relocated to the US. When I asked for 'Kopi O' I got a blank stare from the server because over here it is known as 'Chai (plain, devoid of anything else) Fair', Yau Char Guai is Yau Tiew, Char Suet is Char Ka Ping, ice lemon tea is Doong Leng Char, kampung gai is Chauw Deh Gai (free range chicken) and the list can go on, and on. You are absolutely right, Orange, 'Goh Puat, Ngg Cheen or Ngg Gok' is indeed 'Ngg Hho Chi' here. Police Station/Balai is 'Chai Goon or Geng Chak Gook' and when ordering a bowl of wanton noodles without scallions, it would be 'wuntun meen chauw (means gone/run away) chuong. By and large, the Cantonese spoken here is the Hong Kong version but to this date I still cannot wean myself from our Malaysian Cantonese. At the spur of the moment I would utter something that sounds unfamiliar and I will be greeted with those blank stares of bewilderment all over again.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 31, 2010 7:51pm

Hi Ken,
You're right, the list can go on and on. Smile. Some time back, some Malaysian Chinese went to Hong Kong and ordered Teh Seet (Iced Milk Tea) as what it's called here and all they got was a blank stare or some sarcastic remark from the waiter. I also had my share of these hilarous moments in Chinatown, Boston.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 1, 2010 3:15am

Hi Ken,


Due to the influence from Hong Kong TV series, very often we can hear people use the words 'Chai Fair' instead of Kopi-O now, esp. when staying up late to meet those deadlines. Here, 'Chai Fair' is Instant Coffee (Net). Since FIFA World Cup is coming, lot of 'Chai Fair' is needed to keep those sleepy eyes awake when in office the next morning. Smile


This is the first time I have heard of 'wuntun meen chauw chuong'. Thumbs Up! It sounds very catchy and I like the 'chauw chuong' bit. Thanks for sharing!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 1, 2010 4:35am

Hi Joe.
Now I am not a great cook,I'm just a great eater and I have to say the terms Brinjal,Bawang Puteh,Bawang Merah and Cabai Burong.I knew what they were but did not know the terms in English.This may sound ridiculous,but I didn't.The term "Ubi Kayu",whilst I knew what it meant in Malay,meant nothing to me in my Native Tongue.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
June 1, 2010 6:45am

Hi Jim,
Its ok as long as we know what we're eating. Smile I'm sure many of us over here know the names of certain things but when asked for the translated name, we are stuck. I find that I don't know the names of various fish sold in the market ie ikan kembong (Malay), pak chong/hak chong (Cantonese), Mah Yau (also Cantonese) if translated to either language gives me a blank. Well, as long as it tastes good, lets tuck in. Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 1, 2010 7:45am

Hi Joe & Jim,


Please allow me to be a cikgu for a day. Smile


Pak Chong is Ikan Bawal Puteh
Hak Chong is Ikan Bawal Hitam
Mah Yau is Ikan Kurau


And I am very impressed that Jim knows Cabai Burung!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 1, 2010 1:22pm

Orange,
Is Cabai Burung,an old term?I ask because I now hear them referred to as Padi Cilli
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 1, 2010 3:25pm

We can say Cabai Burung is an old name for Cili Padi but we still use that term. In fact I prefer to use this term and I am very impressed that you know it.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 1, 2010 7:11pm

Orange, what about 'Tau Dei Chong'? What is its Malay name? This is a rather pricey local fish and is always in great demand because its meat is smooth like velvet. Whenever I am back in Malaysia, I try to enjoy this fish as often as possible because it is not available in the US. I like it steamed in premium grade soy sauce and garnished with heaps of scallions, cilantro (yuen sai) and ginger. Alternatively, it can also be steamed in 'teochew' style, with strips of lean pork and shitaki mushrooms on top.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 2, 2010 5:28am

Orange,Before I got Married,my Mother or the Navy cooked for me,if it didn't come out of a can,I seldom cooked it.After I Married I learned of all the different spices and ingredients.But my Wife told me the names in Malay,now I was a poor dumb bloke,who didn't know,to start with what they were in English,so I only knew their names in Malay.Hope you understand
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 2, 2010 8:49am

Hi Ken,


'Tau Dei Chong' is also called 'Ikan Bawal Putih'. 'Tau Dei Chong' is a sought about fish during Chinese New Year esp. during CNY eve.


'Sak Bun' is 'Ikan Kerapu'. As for 'Ikan Hantu', I am always not sure if they are 'Sang Yee' or 'Lam Koh Yee'. Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 2, 2010 8:51am

Hi Jim,


Do you like 'Cili Jeruk' - preserved green cili that goes well with Wan Tan Mee?
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 2, 2010 4:24pm

Orange,
You have the better of me,with 'Cili Jeruk' is it a pickled Cili? I am sure that if it contained Cili,my Wife would have introduced me to it and Wan Tan Me,was one of her favourite dishes along with 'Keoway Teow Th'ng'(Please pardon my spelling)
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 3, 2010 7:29am

Betul Jim! Cili Jeruk adalah 'pickled cili'. Smile
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
June 4, 2010 1:48am

How about some Acar Awak? This is a wonderful dish most people like.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 4, 2010 9:53pm

Sorry Orange,the name I was unsure of.Pickled with Vinegar and Ginger,I have had, with Soy or fish sauce.But I have eaten it on its own with a good Cheese,Crackers and Pints of Guiness.My Wife used to homemake her own Lemon/Chilly Pickle,nothing like it with Fish Curry or Roti Bengali and Sambal Belacan.In fact she gave some to a mate of mine who had it with everything including Breakfast fried eggs and Lunchtime Sandwiches
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 5, 2010 12:12am

Hi Joe,
It truly is amazing isn't it,so many names for the same things,and yet somethings,in another culture are either seldom used or used for different purposes.Ubi Kayu(Correct me if I am wrong,please do}is what we call 'Tapioca' and is used for desserts or for thickening soups etc...In Malaysia it is used as a salted Bar Snack with beer.Eggplant,when I was single,I had never heard of ,until I came to know a Lady who liked Greek Food.The English also know it as 'Aubergine' I think it's a form of Marrow,I could be wrong.Now the English,apart from a love of Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding(And there is a Tradition to Serving That}also introduced me to 'Stuffed Marrow'which I thought was quite nice,'Peas Pudding'not bad and 'Pork Pies'which are magnificent at the Pub with a Pint and of course 'The Ploughmans Lunch' after one of those you thought you could lift a 'Suffolk Punch'
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 6, 2010 5:55am

Wow Jim, I'm indeed very impressed you know 'Roti Bengali'! I'm shy to say I'm not very sure what 'Roti Bengali' is. Apa itu 'Roti Bengali'?
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 6, 2010 7:17pm

Orange,Roti Bengali is what the English would call a Farmhouse Loaf.It is a high risen bread.In Australia I think it would be called a Cob? In Malaysia I have only seen'Roti Bengali' sold in slices,though I'm sure you could buy it by the loaf.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 7, 2010 7:58am

Hi Jim,


Now I remember we used to buy 'Roti Benggali' from the 'roti man' who made his round around our neighbourhood in Ipoh. Normally we bought only 'half a loaf' from him because those 'roti' were without preservative. Thanks Jim!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 7, 2010 4:50pm

Hi Orange,


Thats the one.Very nice toasted and spread with Kaya
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 7, 2010 11:14pm

Orange,


I don't know the secret,I wish I did,but somehow the Pastries and the Breads,in Malaysia always seemed so light and delicious.The 'Egg Custards' the 'Curry Puff' 'Pies' and 'Cream Horns' were so tasty.Likewise the 'Pau' with 'Real Fillings' not the minced stuff that you buy in Supermarkets now,but real Hearty Fillings.My son,who is now 33yrs old,has been eating Kaya on toast,since he was 3yrs old,and still loves it for Breakfast,with Tea
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 8, 2010 6:58am

Jim boleh dapat "Kaya" (coconut jam) di sana?
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 8, 2010 11:53am

Orange,we can get it but,unfortunately,it is the canned variety from Singapore.Very nice,but not the same.Nothing is as fresh as locally made"Kaya" You should try it on toasted,Spicy Raisin Bread,with Coffee,for breakfast(Malaysian Coffee)that will get you through the day,until Lunch
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 8, 2010 8:24pm

Jim, Yeo Hiap Seng's seri kaya that comes in a bottle is almost as good as the home-made variety. My wife makes it the easy way by using the microwave oven, instead of the traditional double-boiler but when she is not free, I just buy Yeo's product. No kidding, seri kaya on cinnamon rasin bread is remarkably tasty. I like to eat it as roti kahwin, where two slices of toasted bread is eaten together, one being spread with seri kaya and the other with slightly salted butter. Wash it down with Ipoh white coffee and it really reminds you of the good old days. I am sure you can get Yeo's seri kaya in a big city like Melbourne. Try it!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 8, 2010 10:35pm

Ken,
Yeos is the one,but canned,and my Son and I eat it just as you do!Though in the winter months I tend to wash it down with tea laced with rum,now that brushes the cobwebs away!
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
June 8, 2010 11:45pm

The roti benggali is nice to go with curry but I still prefer the Vietnamese baguette. When I came back from HCM city, I brought back a bag full of baguettes. Its good to go with curry or better still, with tuna or pate as the Viets have it.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 9, 2010 1:42am

Yes Joe,with the pork pate',vegetables and Cilli.They are delicious for a lunch time snack.I am going into an area of Melbourne(Sunshine)to-morrow and intend to have Vietnamese Noodle Soup for lunch,I will go to the bakery and grab some egg custard for my son along with the Vietnamese Doughnuts
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 10, 2010 6:59am

Hi Ken,


Ayam Brand is another good choice for canned Kaya. Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 10, 2010 6:52pm

Thanks Orange, for the info. Will try to scout around to see if Ayam Brand is available in our grocery shops. I have also tried seri kaya from Indonesia and Thailand and they are not bad too. Seri kaya also goes well with pulut and I like to use as a spread on pancakes too instead of maple syrup.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 11, 2010 11:22am

Hi Ken,


Talking about pulut, 'Chung Festival' is on this coming Wednesday, 16th. June. Smile
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
June 12, 2010 12:14am

Hi Jim,
I like the Vietnamese noodles (Pho Bo). Hope you had a nice lunch. I'm sure you can get practically everything Asian in Melbourne. I was told that Malaysian food is also easily available over there esp. the curry laksa.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 12, 2010 1:00am

Retired Falcon,
Asian food is readily available here,but, and nobody can blame the seller,it caters to an Australian taste.Australians are becoming more Worldy in their tastes,due, I am sure,to our more multicultural approach.Many years ago the average Australian,thought a Curry was no more than a'Stew'that would lift the paint off a Battleship.Now we realise the subtle flavours that make up Asian Cuisine,because we travel more and meet more travellers and we have become more discerning. I had a good lunch thankyou,but I have always noticed that the time you forget your handkerchief,is always the time you will eat Cilli in a Restaurant.I should learn I know
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 12, 2010 1:11am

Orange,
Please what is'Chung Festival'?
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 12, 2010 9:41am

Orange, 'Chung Festival' or Dragon Boat Festival is observed by many Chinese here, especially those who live in Chinatown. There are even dragon boat races, though it is not held on the actual day itself because all special events take place on weekends to attract more tourists and visitors. My 90 year old mother still makes 'Chung' that has dried shrimps, Chinese sausage, pork and peanut fillings. Jim, this festival celebrates the life of a loyal and patriotic Chinese philosopher who was framed by a group of conniving officials. To protest the injustice that was dealt to him, he took his own life by jumping into the river. The peasants rushed out to the river in their boats, making loud noises with their gongs and cymbals in a desperate attempt to save him and frighten away the fishes. At the same time, they made rice dumplings wrapped in bamboo leaves and threw them into the river for the fishes to eat, so that they would not feast on the poor man's body. That is why this festival is celebrated with rice dumplings wrapped in bamboo leaves called 'Chung' and dragon boat races. The festival falls on the 5th day of the fifth month in the lunar calender.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
June 12, 2010 6:49pm

Cheers Ken,something else I have learned.I knew of the 'Dragon Boat Festival'but never knew the story behind it
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 13, 2010 12:54am

Hi Jim,
'Chang' or 'Chung' in Cantonese are glutinuous rice wrapped in bamboo leaves. There are Hokkien Chang, Cantonese Chung, Hainanese Chang (or Pillow Chang) and Nyonya Chang. Most of the 'Chang' are in the shape of pyramid except Hainanese Chang. Smile



Hi Ken,
Many big Chinese restaurants and some hotels served jumbo-sized 'Chung'. I always prefer those 'Nyonya Chung' flavoured with 'Bunga Telang' (Blue pea flowers) prepared by our relatives. I miss those 'Kan Sui Chung' from Ipoh. They are not easily available here. Sad
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 13, 2010 5:46am

Hi Orange,
The folks in Chinatown make pillow-shaped 'chung' too and my mom said that's how it is done in China. The shops in Vietnamese Town have the pyramid-shape type, just like what we have in Malaysia. I don't really care what shape it is in, the taste is all that matters. When you mention 'Byonya chung', it brought back memories of my days in Penang and Melaka. Some of my baba friends invite me to their house to celebrate the festival and they load me up with this type of 'chung'. When we were in Malaysia, our family will have both the Cantonese and Hokkien verion ('Bak chung' where the pulut is thoroughly mixed with a tinge of dark soya sauce) for the occasion but these days, with age catching up with her, mom just make the Cantonese type. They keep very well and you can deep-freeze it for a long time. Once thoroughly steamed, it taste as good as the freshly-made ones. The restaurants and pastry shops here sell 'Chung' all year round and we can even have it in dim sum shops. Jim, I am sure you can get it from your Chinatown. Just for the heck of it, maybe you should buy one and try. Perhaps it will remind you of the ones you have tasted in Malaysia.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 13, 2010 8:03am

Hi Ken,


Between 'Ho Yit Funn' (lotus leaf rice) and 'Chang', I prefer 'Chang' even though the ingredients for these are more or less the same. Prehaps it's the way they are cooked. It takes more than 3 hours to boil 'Chang'. Moreover, 'Chang' are tightly wrapped and tied up. I believe the compactness contributes to the good taste of 'Chang'. Well, others may have different views. Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 13, 2010 8:37am

Hi Orange,
Given a choice, I also prefer 'chung' to 'Hor Yip Fann'. Somehow, I like the aroma of bamboo leaves more than the smell of lotus leaves. Overall, I am a pulut person and I also enjoy 'Sang Chauw Lor Mai Fann' and 'Lor Mai Gai' too. That is why all the other Nyonya kuih that is made with pulut are also my favorites.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
June 14, 2010 6:08am

Hi Orange and Ken
Looks like we all love 'chang' and everything made from glutinous rice! I enjoy not only the savoury stuff but also the sweet cakes made from 'pulut' like pulut tai tai, pulut inti and bee koh. If you can't remember what nyonya cakes I'm talking about Ken, just let me know and I'll describe it to you in such detail that you might want to take the next flight home!!
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 14, 2010 7:00am

Hi Ken,


'Lor Mai Gai' and 'Ho Yip Fann' ..... I think I'll stick to 'Ho Yip Fann' as it's less oily than 'Lor Mai Gai' as the lotus leaves absorb much of the oil from the meat and fat in the 'Ho Yip Fann'. Very often, after removing the 'Lor Mai Gai' from the steaming bowl (either metallic or ceramic), we can see lots of oil left in the bowl.


Is 'Sang Chauw Lor Mai Fann' same as those no frill 'Lor Mai Fann' with lots of groundnuts (in whole) and 'udang kering' steamed in a big round metal tray and we can buy any amount from the hawker. If it's the same 'Lor Mai Fann', then it's my favourite childhood food. Smile Used to eat it with chilly sauce. I don't think we can get it in KL. Miss that food very much!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 14, 2010 9:16am

Hi Orange & Blue Grass,
Strange isn't it, we share a common preference for food, especially for pulut, even though in my case, I am thousands of miles away. For me, it runs in the family because my late dad loves anything pulut too. Orange, 'Sang Chauw Lor Mai Fann' is exactly what you have described but those sold here comes with diced chinese sausage (Larp Cheong) and to make it visually appealing, they also add in finely diced carrots and scallions for the colorful effect. Americans are great meat eaters and the ABC's (American Born Chinese) love to order this delicacy in the Dim Sum restaurants.


Blue Grass, I do remember Pulut Tai Tai (pulut colored with bunga telang, and spread with Seri Kaya), Pulut Inti (pulut heaped with gula Melaka flavored, grated coconut topping)and Bee Koh (pulut pudding with rich coconut milk and flavored with pandan leaves). Remember, I spent some tine in Penang and Melaka when I was single even have Nyonya girl friends. My wife is not of Hokkien/Nyonya ancestry but she likes to dabble in Malaysian cooking too. These days, with ingredients so readily available and recipes are downloaded with a few key strokes, that is not a hard thing to do. The most impotant motivating factor is that we all love food and that reason alone speaks for itself.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 15, 2010 1:53am

Hi Ken & Blue Grass,


'Nasi Kunyit' (Wong Kiong Fann) is another pulut dish. Whenever we have birthdays or baby full-moon celebrations in our family, I am always asked to cook 'Nasi Kunyit' and curry chicken. Everyone 'puji' my curry chicken (dry version with lots of pototes). Smile Well, it's not self praise and they have to be nice (extraordinary nice) to me if they want to eat the curry chicken that I cook! Smile!
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
June 15, 2010 8:34pm

Ken, you do us foodies proud! You have not forgotten our local names of food, well done. Foodie here and fortunately married to one too. Hence we don't think much of traveling miles and miles for good food. We take long leisurely drives to places for food and bird watch along the way in the weekends. Killing two birds with one stone eh?


Orange we must not forget, of course, the very delicious 'Nasi Kunyit' and chicken curry. Not everyone does it well, so congrats.


Have started eating 'chang' and have soft spot for 'kee chang' which is eaten with sweet syrupy gula melaka. My in-laws make the best 'kee chang' in town - soft with a bite! They tell me the art is in filling the bamboo leaf with very little pulut, so one should hear the pulut rattling inside when shaken. There goes the waistline.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 15, 2010 10:27pm

Hi Orange,
Nasi Kunyit is another of my all-time favorite and just as you have said, it is a 'must have' on festive occasions. Eaten with traditional Nyonya-style kari ayam, this pulut delicacy is hard to beat. Since your kari ayam is so popular, perhaps you can share your recipe with us.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 16, 2010 6:20am

Blue Grass, what is 'Kee Chang' please? 'Kan Sui Chung'?


Since we were kids, we eat 'roti canai' and 'Kan Sui Chung' with sugar. I still eat 'Kan Sui Chung' with sugar till the present day. One of my friends eats 'roti canai' with 'pak yew' (light soya sauce) from she was a kid till now - a successful accountant! Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 16, 2010 6:52am

Hi Ken,


To cook good and tasty 'kari ayam' is same like cooking any other dish - all ingredients must be fresh and we cannot be 'kedekut'. Smile


The important thing when cooking 'kari ayam' is when we 'tumis' those grounded ginger, onions, garlic and 'tepung kari'. The trick is to 'tumis' the 'tepung kari' till the rempah has a good aroma and the oil rises to the surface. We have to be very patient and not to hurry at this stage. A good curry should not smell like raw curry powder.


Another point to note is the chicken pieces must be saute till all the chicken pieces are well coated with the 'rempah' before adding the 'kentang water' (keep the 'kentang water' after boiling) and 'santan'. Of course, curry leaves are very essential!


But then again, no matter how hard we try to cook anything, it won't turn out nice and tasty if there is not love and passion. That's why we always say "Mum's cooking is THE BEST!" Thumbs Up!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 16, 2010 2:40pm

Hi Orange,
Thanks for the tips on cooking kari ayam yang sedap. You really sound like a profesional master chef because you know what you are talking and it makes sense too.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
June 16, 2010 8:20pm

Hi Orange, Ken, Blue grass and Jim,
I love the 'Chung' esp. the Nyonya chung and I've been looking for a place that sells really good ones. My aunt used to make it but has stopped making it due to her age. In Vietnam, they have their own 'chung' during the Tet festival and its green in colour.
While on the subject of cooking, food will definitely taste good if it is cooked with love.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
June 17, 2010 5:33am

Hi Orange
Your are right that 'Kee Chang' is 'Kan Sui Chung' as the former is Hokkien and yours Cantonese. Have you tried eating 'Kan Sui Chung' with gula Melaka syrup? If not you must give it a try. Sugar is just sweet without the beautiful aroma of coconut and gula Melaka [palm sugar].
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
June 17, 2010 5:39am

Hi Joe
Looks as though you are also a 'pulut' fan. Nyonya chang is not that easy to find in Ipoh and do hope you have better luck in KL. We also refer to it as 'Puah Kiam Ti Chang'[sweet and salty dumpling].
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
June 17, 2010 8:30am

Hi Blue Grass,
'Kan Sui Chung' eaten with a generous dripping of gula melaka is indeed a delectable treat. Needless to say, I acquired this neat way to enjoy 'Kan Sui Chung' from my Nyonya/Hokkien friends. Before that, I used to smear Seri Kaya onto the 'Kan Sui Chung' but enjoying it with gula melaka is definitely the better option. To give it that extra crunch, sometimes I add in nuts like cashew or pistachio. With the additional nutty topping, the humble 'Kan Sui Chung' will be magically transformed into a very presentable dessert. Talking about 'Puah Kiam Ti Chang', I dig this Nyonya/Hokkien delicacy too. When we were living in Ipoh we have Hokkien neighbors and every year we trade our Cantonese 'Chung' for their Hokkien 'Chang', a gesture that has cemented a lifetime of friendship and goodwill between our families. There is always some 'Chung' in my freezer and it comes in handy when I am smitten with a sudden craving for pulut.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
June 18, 2010 4:53am

Hi Blue Grass,


In Ipoh, we eat 'Putu Mayam' with white sugar, whereas in KL, 'Putu Mayam' is served with brown sugar. I find it very weird. So I stick to white sugar when eating 'Putu Mayam'. Smile


I eat 'Kan Sui Chung' with 'Gula Melaka' only during Chang Festival. In Ipoh, we can get 'Kan Sui Chung' throughout the year. White sugar is easily available unlike gula melaka, we have to melt it. So when we were kid, we ate 'Kan Sui Chung' with white sugar without having to melt the 'Gula Melaka' esp. when only one person was eating. I still love to eat 'Kan Sui Chung' with white sugar till today - just to reminisce those sweet childhood days. Smile


Someone told me this: "Childhood food is our comfort food for the rest of our life."
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 17, 2011 3:03am

Hi Kayes, Joe, Ken, Orange,


I finally manage to eat my favorite Ma Jay Curry Noodle. I spoke with the younger and older owner and they willing let me take some photos. Kayes, when I am back in US, I will send you the photos. I am on my last day in Penang. Going out to Gurney Drive for dinner.


ACS77
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 17, 2011 6:22am

Hi Kayes,


By the way, I am manage to have 2 bowls of Penang Laksa in Ayer Itam Marketplace. The taste is just the same as 40 years ago. Had Tee Ngar Koh, Muar Chee, Ban Chan Kueh and a few other Nyonya kueh. I think I am satisfied now. I can continue on to Singapore.


ACS77
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 17, 2011 9:12am

Wow Sam! "The taste is just the same as 40 years ago" ..... Great tagline for this Assam Laksa stall. Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
February 17, 2011 6:47pm

Hi Sam,
Thanks for sharing your delightful culinary experience with us. There is no substitute for the real thing, so when you are back in the old country, eat as much as you possibly can. Worry about putting on the extra pounds or indigestion later. Enjoy!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
February 21, 2011 3:00pm

hello Sam, very pleased to hear you enjoyed your stay in Penang and Ipoh. Send me as many pics as you like and I will post them for you Smile
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 23, 2011 1:49pm

Hi Kayes,


Will send you the pictures once we have overcome jet lag, laundry, etc.


Hi Ken,


I checked my weight when I got back. No change in weight. I guess, all the food taken in equals all the sweats given out : ) In all the cities with exception of Hong Kong, we had experince very hot weather. Have to sneek into air-cond places between tours to cool down. In fact, my son said that he had never seen his daddy so RED, when we resting (beneath the Singapore Flyer) after our tour of Singapore Botanical Garden at noon (arrange by tour, not our choice).


Hi Orange,


You have to remember, I used to visit my god parents in Air Itam area in the late 60's and the laksa store was already there. Same spot.


Sam
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
February 23, 2011 6:59pm

Hi Sam,
Welcome home! Like you, I enjoy my oversea trips to the hilt but once I am back in the States, I feel a sense of relief because I am back in my comfort zone again. I can understand how unbearable the tropical heat and humidity can be. That is why I have not been back as often as I wanted because my wife and kid just balk at the thought of the sweltering temperature, the mosquitoes, and the sweaty clothes that cling to the body. Mind you, my wife is Malaysian-born and Chicago's summer can be extremely hot too. Yet she is extremely susceptible to the humidity, to the point that it affects her breathing. Nevertheless, I plan to' balik kampung' more frequently after my retirement and besides the sumptuous food, it would be fun to renew acquaintance with friends and classmates again. Since some of my siblings have summer homes in KL and Penang, accommodation is not a problem. These trips can be very tiring because we always try to cover as much ground as possible with the limited time we have. Wind down and have a good rest before going back to work.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 24, 2011 4:38am

Assam Laksa in Air Itam .....


"Same Spot and Same Taste after more than 40 years" - no amount of advertisings can match this sincere comment from Sam (someone who has been away from the country for many years and came back to savour this Malaysian signature dish). This reminds me of this Cantonese sayings: "Chan Kam But Bah Hoong Loh Foh" (pure gold not afraid of red hot fire). Good food can stand the test of time!
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 24, 2011 4:44am

"Chan Kam But Bah Hoong Loh Foh"!


What about friendship, relationship or love? I DOUBT!! Sad
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 24, 2011 7:35am

Hi Ken,


This trip we use Singapore Airline Vacation. It's pretty good. For $1399 per person, we get to stay 3 nights in Hong Kong and 3 in Singapore, plus transport to and from airport to hotels, half days tour in Singapore and HK. Breakfast included. Our son pays only $1000.
Furthemore, when we were in Ipoh, we got a private "hotel" where we stayed for RM$60.00 per day with air cond, hot water showers and free internet. The place is located in Shatin Park in New Parsir Putih, very close to all the makan places.


As for the weather, I was just wondering while driving to work, how funny to be sweaty just a few days ago and right now, it is freezing. Well, you learn to appreciate what you have.


Sam
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 24, 2011 8:18am

Hi Sam,


Didn't know there is a "private hotel" in Shatin Park. There are only few roads in Shatin Park and all the houses are single storey terrace houses. A hotel in Shatin Park?! It sounds very interesting! What is the name and address of this "Private Hotel", please?
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 24, 2011 12:11pm

Hi Orange,


I know you will be curious. This private hotel is right across the road from the Shell Station. It's address is 1, Lebuh Shation 9. Shatin Park. This is a renovated single storey, corner lot. They added a 2nd storey and also car parking in the compound. This property belongs to a friend of my brother (the one who owns Elegant Optical). If phone number is needed, I can provide.


Sam
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 25, 2011 6:19am

Hi Sam,


I think I know the place. It used to be a home tuition centre. This corner lot can be seen from the main road. When I first read your post, I thought this private hotel must be at one of the shop houses near KFC or Old Town Cafe, Taman Kar King, next to Shatin Park. Didn't expect it to be at one of the terrace houses. Is RM60 for the whole house or just for one room? Is the room with bathroom attached?


I had been staying near that neighbourhood for years, and yet I need someone from overseas to inform me about this hotel. How ironic! Smile
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
February 25, 2011 7:11am

Hi Orange,


RM$60 is for a room with 3 beds. They have rooms with 2 beds for RM$35. Rooms are with attached bathrooms. When we were there, we literally have the whole house for RM$60 a day. What is interesting is that, it came with free WiFi, whereas most hotels will charge you for that.


Sam
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
February 25, 2011 6:23pm

Many budget hotels are mushrooming in the Klang Valley. From what are printed on those banners advertising for some of the budget hotels, rate is as low as RM9.90 per hour. Now, who wants to stay in hotel for merely an hour? So funnyyyyyy! Smile
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 10, 2013 7:07am

Sun tan anyone?


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril41.jpg
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
April 10, 2013 8:27am

Hi Kayes,


We pick up some graded coconut for the "Lean Koh" at this shop during my trip back to Ipoh recently for CNY.


Sam
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 11, 2013 3:44am

Santan or fresh coconut milk bought from shop like this is always fresher and more concentrate. They put in one whole load of graded coconut into the machine to squeeze out all the essence from the coconuts. At home, if we squeeze one or two coconuts manually, the santan will never be as concentrated as those squeezed using machine. This is a very new trade and we just need two or three spoonfuls of the santan for any curry or lemak, the gravy will usually be thick and delicious.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 13, 2013 2:38am

It's good to have your wedding portrait hung here.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril65.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 13, 2013 3:06am

The building on the right has recently been restored but it now looks like a box.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril66.jpg
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 13, 2013 9:23am

The Chinese signage on the pillar (second pic. from bottom with wedding portrait on it) reads as 'Chew Fatt Chinese and Western Medical Hall. Embossed with beautiful Chinese typography sign-craft is uniquely Chinese - no other business except Chinese businesses have this type of signage. Glad that the embossed signage is so well maintained by this medical hall. We don't see new embossed signage with Chinese characters on pillars anymore ..... Sad
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 13, 2013 6:31pm

Only Chinese businesses can have embossed signage on pillars as Chinese characters can be read from top to bottom. There is no way to have "Wilson & Son Dispensary" embossed on any vertical pillar. Uniquely Chinese!!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 13, 2013 8:04pm

A ruby in black & white.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril67.jpg


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril68.jpg


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril69.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 13, 2013 8:27pm

I still can't figure out which particular shoplot was the former Sydney. They used to sell liquor and soft drinks as well. I used to hang out there.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril71.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
April 13, 2013 8:33pm

Looking down Leong Sin Nam Street from Anderson Road.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics8/ipohapril72.jpg
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 15, 2013 3:09am

Last pic. from bottom:


Leong Sin Nam Street's big tree is still there - after all these years! This must be the only street in the entire Ipoh city with big tree growing in the middle of a divider. No one disturbs it and obviously no fanatic Feng Sui believer around! Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 18, 2013 3:12am

At home, we were taught to use 1st. santan and 2nd santan when cooking curries. To get the 1st santan, pour 1 cup of warm water over 1 cup of grated coconut and let it soaked for few minutes. Press the soaked grated coconut in the hand to extract the coconut milk. Use sieve to keep out the grated coconut. After extracting the 1st santan, pour warm water over the same grated coconut to get 2nd santan.


While cooking curry, pour the 2nd santan first. When the curry is almost ready, pour in the 1st santan and let it simmer for a short while before removing it from the stove.


Santan from santan shop (like "Santan Fair Park" in Kayes's pic. above) is of the same consistency. There is no 1st santan or 2ns santan and the santan is sold in kg. Time and trend change. There is no alternative but to modify the santan by adding water to make 2nd. santan. So don't blame us when the curries are not as authentic or as good as those we were taught as it's impossible to get the correct ratio!! Sad



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