SunMon TueWed ThuFri Sat
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

DSC_0033.jpg
Chamberlain Road
kayes

[ New Town ]
form6ua.jpg
ACS Ipoh
kayes

[ Schools ]
DSCF0907.jpg
KLCC
kayes

[ Kuala Lumpur ]
DSCF0829.jpg
Kuala Kangsar Road
kayes

[ Elsewhere in/near Ipoh ]
DSCF2143.jpg
Jalan Ali Pitchay
kayes

[ New Town ]
polevault.jpg
pole vault
kayes

[ Butterflies, Birds & All Things Beautiful ]
· more ·

 
more
budwhere.jpg
fpark12.jpg
ipohmarch11.jpg
churchwhat.jpg
smartsdredge.jpg
more

ipohmarch11
sunrise on 29 February 2010

kayes



Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
users gallery
On my way into Ipoh on 29 Feb I saw this sunrise.
· Date: March 2, 2010 · Views: 19400 ·
Print View


Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 2, 2010 9:41am

Hello Kayes,


It was 28 Feb., not 29 Feb. 2010 :-)


Love the dreamy faraway hills and they look exactly like Chinese brush painting. The colours of the sky illuminated by the soft glow from the early sun are fantastic - love the still greyish sky, telling us a new day has come. The sun looks very sweet at this time of the day, since we have been having hot himid days for the past few weeks.


The dotted lines and the white lines on the highway were captured clearly even though the sun was not that bright yet. Brilliant! Love this shot! 10 Thumbs Up!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 2, 2010 2:14pm

haha Orange, I got my leap years mixed up :-)
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
March 3, 2010 1:55am

I was rather amused to see that you seemed to have had an extra day in your month of February, Kayes!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 6, 2010 3:23pm

You take Beautiful Pics Kayes,if a picture can invoke a feeling,this one makes me feel homesick.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 6, 2010 4:59pm

Jim,
Indeed, everyone one of those shots are like lightning rods that trigger off powerful feelings of nostalgia in us. The pictures make me yearn for the green, green grass of home because my front yard is still blanketed with snow even though it is March, and Spring is just around the corner. For people like you and me who reside thousands of miles away, feeling homesick is an understatement.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 6, 2010 10:10pm

And isn't it sad Ken,that we don't appreciate all the Beauty and Peace that we have had,til, we no longer have it.
P.S. You can keep the snow
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
March 6, 2010 11:01pm

Hi Ken and Jim


I'm not sure which is the harder to bear - sweltering heat or bitter cold? We have had temperatures of about 36 degrees Celsius not only in Ipoh but throughout the country. Even Cameron Highlands has not been spared. The sun does not set till late in the evening as the skies are still bright after 7pm.

Take heart Ken and Jim, keep all your happy memories of Malaysia and look forward to another holiday back here. The 'hor fun, pop piah, laksa, mee rebus and cold beers are just a flight away! Cheers.


The migratory birds are still around in our garden as I hear them even if I don't see them. I should think they will take the long journey home soon. Winter is almost over.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 7, 2010 6:34am

Hi Blue Grass & Jim,
You're right Blues Grass, there are weather woes in every part of the world. A cousin of mine spent the CNY holidays with us and the minute she reached KLIA she had to look for a place to shower because she has never experienced such a heat wave before in Malaysia. I remember being toasted by the blistering heat (41 degrees Celsius) in Rome last summer and we have to run from the sun by seeking refuge under the ruins. I am already naturally endowed with dark complexion and by the time I was back from vacation, I became "hitam" (but not "manis") literally. Just yesterday, there was a hailstorm in the vicinity of Melbourne and the area was pelted by golf ball size hail, with 100 m.p.h. winds. So Jim, I hope you are not affected in any way. At least, we don't have to contend with natural calamities like the earthquakes in Haiti, Chile and Taiwan.


Thanks for consoling foreign exiles like us. In actuality, life here is not that bad. It is just that we are from that part of the world and quite naturally, we do get smitten with sentimental feelings for the old country. I miss the hawkers but we do have access to almost all kinds of ingredients to 'masak' Malaysian food. To me, with the changing of the four seasons, time seems to pass faster, psychologically. I'll keep the snow for sure, Jim. Cross-country skiing in fresh, pristine snow can be an enjoyable experience because the stunningly-beautiful scenery in the parklands is picture-perfect. Yes, I can hear the migratory birds too and they are getting louder with each passing day. It's almost time to think about planting and yard work again!


P.S. Joe Chin, a.k.a Retired Falcon has been unusually quiet for an extended period of time. Has anyone heard from him ? Hope all is well with him and his family.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 8, 2010 12:19am

Ken,I am sure Cross Country Ski-ing in the snow is fun.Standing Sentry Duty in it, is not exactly a barrel of laughs.But different strokes for different folks.I will take Malaysia's Climate,any day.I still remember standing Sentry,on HMS/m Warspite,in Scotland,I wore Arctic Unerwear,Arctic Singlet.Arctic Socks,Two pair of pants,a Denim Shirt,a Navy issue Black Pullover,A White Submarine Sweater,A Balaclava,Woolen Gloves and Mittens.Covered,overall with wet Weather Gear and I was still cold.My claim to fame that night,was that in the morning,when my Trot Finished,the only place on the forward casing,that was not iced over,was where I had relieved my bladder.I was 19yrs old and it must have been my Hot Colonial Blood.Still no mean feat when you consider the amount of clothing I was wearing
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 8, 2010 4:21am

hi Ken, I am also wondering what has happened to Joe. A month back, I think he did post a message saying he was very busy. Hope to read his interesting posts again.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 9, 2010 3:27am

I read an interesting story on the 'Falcons' an Ipoh Group,I believe? and Joe was mentioned.I to hope he is well.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 12, 2010 7:17am

Hi Kayes and everyone,
Glad to be back on Italk again. My streamyx was just reconnected a few hours ago having been out for quite a while. I just bought a little apt. in the city and just moved in. Everything's fine and will be back to posting on Italk again.
Ken, glad you're able to start planting again after having been snowed out
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 12, 2010 7:22am

Jim, the Falcons is from Ipoh and we were just teenagers then when we started the group. That was the good ol' 60's. Yes, I'm fine and will be posting again.
Blue grass, I like the mention of Hor Fun, popiah and stuff. Good ol' Malaysian food esp. Ipoh food.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 12, 2010 7:34pm

hi Joe, good to see you back at Ipoh Talk Smile
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 13, 2010 3:39am

Hi Kayes, thanks. I'm now settled in at my apt. and raring to go in search of some nice places to eat in my area so that I can let you guys in on it. I know there is a good dim sum place in Ipoh Rd. and nearby is a good Ampang Yong Tow Foo. Its a stone's throw from my place so I may head there later. Maybe Ken will know of some good places to recommend. He's a walking food blog and knows all the good places.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 13, 2010 3:04pm

Hi Joe,
It's great to hear from you again and as always, you have provided us with an endless source of info about 'makan' places. A great deal of changes have taken place since I left and many of the restaurants and stalls mentioned in this forum don't even register a blip on my food radar. As it is, I am too out-of-touch to recommend any hip places in KL, Ipoh or Penang for good food. The restaurants and stalls I know are the 'old faithfuls' that have been around for several decades and many of them are still doing very well today. Yong Tow Foo originated from the Hakka Chinese and the later versions evolved from the Teochew and Hokkien communities. Ampang Yong Tow Foo is sold in many parts of KL and PJ but my favorite is Restoran Foong Foong located along Jalan Besar Ampang, within Ampang itself. Some variations of Yong Tow Foo have ground pork fillings instead of fish paste, and the taste and texture is refreshingly different. During the early 80's, there was a stall on Jalan Lau Pak Khuan in Ipoh Garden that sells pork Yong Tow Foo. In those days, a group of us would routinely adjourn to Fat City Pub or Carousel Inn for a few rounds of beer after work. Next, we would head to those hawker stalls to chow down and in my case, I must make a pit stop at this particular Yong Tow Foo stall. This stall could still be in business but it must have relocated to another part of town.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 13, 2010 3:48pm

I hope you know Ken,that this could be deemed cruel and unusual punishment,in certain circles.Discussing delicious food has been known to trigger many stomach rumblings and excessive salivation to the digestive system of exiles,such as myself
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 13, 2010 11:56pm

Besides pork, some Yong Tau Foo were stuffed with Hum Yee (salted fish) too.


Due to the present hot weather and inspired by this post about Yong Tau Foo, today I made Yong Tau Foo for lunch. The big Ikan Tenggiri (Kaw Yee) was deboned. The fish head and fish bone were made into soup. Po Choy was added to the soup.


The flesh of the Tenggiri was 'tumbuk' into paste and salt water added to the fish paste. Brinjal, fresh red chillies, bitter gourd and ladies' fingers (I dislike that slimy transparent juice of the ladies' fingers but I had to handle the okra anyway even though I don't eat ladies' fingers) were stuffed with fish paste. Gravy for the Yong Tau Foo was made using Tau Chong (bean paste). The Yong Tau Foo, the Po Choy Tong were savoured with my signature dish Smile - Mee Hoon Siam. We can buy ready made fish paste from the wet market but nothing beats the freshness of the home made Yong Tau Foo and no perservative was added to the fish paste. Yummy! So happy that all these were finished within minutes. Thumbs Up!


As for the afternoon tea for today, I steamed the Nien Koh (Kueh Bakul) from CNY and tossed them in slightly salted freshly grind coconut instead of frying the Nien Koh sandwished with yam and sweet potatoes - to avoid 'heatiness' due to the hot weather.


I think this hot spell is going off soon because 'Ching Ming' is coming - 5th of April.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 14, 2010 4:53am

Hi Ken,
The old faithfuls are still the best and I'm sure many are still around though some may have given way to the newer set of places. Someone mentioned to me an old Hainanese restaurant in Jln. Dang Wangi near the old Odeon theatre in KL and thats where you get the old style Hainanese chicken chop or beef steak. The only problem is you have to wait until your tummy growls before your order is served. Must be real good huh!
You also mentioned Fat City and Carousel Inn which rings a bell. Back in those days, these places were the more popular watering holes. Cheers!!!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 14, 2010 7:08am

Hi Joe,
Hainanese cooks are well-known for their culinary skills. Even in the early days when there were not many big and fanciful restaurants in the catering business, the well-heeled Nyonya families in the Straits Settlement would employ Hainanese chefs to cook for them during important family functions at home. (The Nyonya term for the sumptuous and elaborate banquet is"Tok Panjang") In the later years, Hainanese cooks were also an important asset in the households of expatriate mining and estate managers. The only old-world favorite I know of in the Odeon KL area is Coliseum Hotel and dining in its restaurant is like a stroll down memory lane. The wood panels and the 1920's furniture are still intact and the wait staff, in their stiffly starched uniforms are quietly efficient as always. The ambience is quite reminiscent of the legendary FMS Hotel and the food is skewed with colonial influence. After you have discovered this old Hainanese restaurant, please keep us posted with the info about this hidden gem.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 15, 2010 2:29am

The Mee Rebus at the backlane of the good old Kopitiam in Jalan Dang Wangi sells marvellous mee rebus. The stall has been there for ages. Whenever we have mee rebus there, customers tend to stir up conversations with each other. One customer told us he has been eating the mee rebus from that stall when KL Race Course was still at Jalan Parry. Wow!


The mee rebus stall is right at back of the kopitiam. The lane looks "Lau Yah" but customers can always ask them to send the mee rebus into the kopitiam. On the down side, the quality of the mee rebus is deteriorating ever since this present lady takes over. Hope it's a different person running the stall when I go there next because the stall always changes hands. More than ten people (one after another) have been running the stall because once the owner has made enough money, he goes back to India but the taste remains the same throughout. But just that I find the quality from this present lady (first time a female running this mee rebus stall) is not that good. Prejudice ..... you can call it if you want to! Smile
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 15, 2010 6:04am

The mee rebus sounds good. I must try to locate some time soon.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
March 15, 2010 7:10am

Welcome back Joe. These days, I am also not too regular.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 15, 2010 7:53am

Hi Hokin,
Good to hear from you too. How are things with you? I have a lot of catching up to do here on Italk having been away for some time. Will try to post more often.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
March 16, 2010 6:04am

Glad to have you back Joe. Like Jim said you and Ken are very good at getting our gastric juices going! I remember it was such a treat to eat at the Rest Houses where the cooks were Hainanese, when we traveled between Ipoh and KL. I faintly recall that the Tapah Rest House was located on a hill overlooking extensive grounds and the one in Tanjong Malim near the train station or railway line. The Hainanese cooks definitely served the best chicken chops. Joe do let us know about this Hainese restaurant in KL if you check it out.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 17, 2010 12:26am

Thanks, Blue grass, the Hainese cooks were really good and one of my favourite plces is in a corner shop in Kuala Kangsar where there are still famous for their pau.
As for the other Hainanese shop in KL,I will let you in on the name when I get back to KL tomorrow. Apparently, you have quite a long wait for the dishes to be served as it is always crowded and have to share your table at times. I won't mind waiting if the food is good.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 17, 2010 6:33am

Hi Joe,


What is the name of the corner coffee shop in Kuala Kangsar? Do they still sell pau?


When we were staying in Ipoh, the coffee shop near our Ipoh house belonged to our relative and they sold all kinds of pau. Every night we had supper just before 12.00 midnight and it was always "tai pau". Just like all bakeries in KL, we can get "buy one, free one" after 9p.m., but those "tai pau'' we got were free of charge. So, it was always the same supper for us and at the same time - just before 12.00 midnight! Even our dogs got fed up eating "tai pau" every night. Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 18, 2010 12:37am

During CNY visiting, some relatives were complaining that it's very difficult to make good pau nowdays because they just can't get the flour they used to use. The logo of the flour is a KEY.


These old timers refuse to change the brands they have been using for years. Brands like 'SCS' butter, 'Key' brand flour, 'Bird?' custard, '?' vanilla essence etc. etc. They always say foods during those days taste better .....
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 18, 2010 4:17am

Hi Orange,
I think the name of the coffeeshop is Yut Loy Kedai Kopi. The pau is usually sold out early in the afternoon so gotta be there early. I like their Hainanese fried mee (Everything here is halal).
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 18, 2010 4:12pm

Thanks Joe! MCKK boys sure have lots to reminisce ..... Thumbs Up!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 18, 2010 4:52pm

Indeed I think every MCKK old boy would have eaten at Yut Loy. On weekends, when they were let out from their hostels (especially in the 1950s and 60s), all the MCKK boys would head for a feast in town and the most popular eatery for them would be Yut Loy. I had a relative whose shop was at the same block and so I had the chance to experience the popularity of this coffee shop.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 19, 2010 3:23am

Hi Blue grass and Ken,
The name of the Hainanese restaurant is Yut Kee in Jln. Dang Wangi near the old Odeon theatre. If you go in a bigger group, then you can have the table for yourselves cos if you're alone, you might have to share it with others. Service is a bit slow but the food is good.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 19, 2010 10:25pm

Hi Joe,
Sounds like an interesting find indeed. Is this restaurant serving strictly Hainanese-style Western food like steaks and pork chops, or is there an eclectic mix of western and oriental food? Hainanese chefs are known to be very innovative and they can blend different types of cooking with very creative flair. Some popular dim sum restaurants in Chinatown also encourage table-sharing, especially on the weekends. When there is limited seating capacity and the food is good, I guess that is the only recourse.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 20, 2010 1:42am

Hi Ken,
Yut Kee is a typical Hainanese shop serving the usual western style food as well as their fried noodles just like Yut Loy in KK and FMS in Ipoh.
While on the subject of Hainanese food, do you remember John's shop in Canning Garden famous for their chicken chop or beef steak? That guy is still around but has moved over to just a stall at the corner coffee shop. The cooking is done by his son now but he's there helping at the stall. I normally go there for their Kai Lup Fun which is quite good besides their chops etc.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 20, 2010 5:50am

Hi Joe,
Thanks for jolting my memory, I almost forgot about John's shop after being away for all these years. Glad to know that he is still around, but he must be in his ripe old age now. Wonder if his son's culinary skills are just as good. I have eaten in Yut Loy in KK a few times but never had the chance to check out all the specialties. Malaysian Hainanese food is indeed unique and Hainanese chefs are the pioneers in fusion cooking.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 20, 2010 6:08am

hi Blue Grass, thanks for bringing up the good old Rest Houses. During the old days when there was no Expressway, these Rest Houses prevented many bladders from bursting. When driving from Ipoh to KL, my regular stop was at the Slim River Rest House. And if going from Ipoh to Camerons using the old road, a stop at the Tapah Rest House was a must. Food at both these Rest Houses was good and I particularly like the Slim River Rest House which was run by a lady for many years. Her family (I never saw the husband) lived behind the Rest House and she kept the front toilet clean. She could also remember what I liked to eat. Like you say, the Tapah one was up on a hill which reminds me of the one in Kuala Kangsar which is also on a hill, Bukit Chandan.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 20, 2010 9:23am

My immediate boss is a MCKK boy and he loves no other coffee but Ipoh local coffee. His P.A. finds it very messy to prepare the local coffee in the office. So I suggested coffee sachets. She said he prefers freshly ground Ipoh coffee. I also suggested coffee making machine but she said just one cup is always enough. Eventually I order a glass jar (just the right size for one cup) with sieve attached from China. Actually that glass jar is meant for making Chinese tea but I don't see why we can't use it for making local coffee. Both of us shared and gave that to him as a birthday present. I did that not because he is my immeidate boss but because he (a Kelantanese) loves Ipoh so much! Smile
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 20, 2010 9:47am

We used to have John Restaurant at Jalan Masjid India, KL. When John Restaurnat was at Jalan Masjid India, it was managed by two brothers together with their wives, and their children after their father passed down the business to them. John Restaurant served good chicken chops, beef steak and fried noodles. Every lunch hour, the restaurant was packed with office workers and business was very good but John restaurant at Jalan Masjid India was forced to close due to road expansion. From here, one of the brothers together with his wife opened a stall at Semua house. Not long after that, this John Restaurant at Semua House was closed too due to this couple's advanced age and their children's reluctance to take over the business. Their three children have their own professions, some with Masters and are working abroad. This is the norm for almost all Hainanese kopitiams. Their children have seen how their parents waking up at the wee hours of the day and worked till late at night. Besides having their professions, they find it very tedious and tiring to take over the business. This explains why not all kopitiams are Hainanese owned after 3rd. or 4th generation.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
March 20, 2010 5:26pm

One of the most well known MCKK old boys from Ipoh must be Tan Sri Megat Najmuddin. "Mack" (friends call him that) used to live in Canning and he was one of my former business partners. Mack played rugby for MCKK and later for University of Singapore as well as for the Cobras in Selangor. He married an Ipoh girl. I also used to know Fatah Rejab who was the school's rugby team captain in the 60s. Anthony Loo Yew Khim (from Penang) taught in MCKK for many years. Each time I am in Kuala Kangsar I would enjoy looking at the school's huge grounds and I like especially the row of hostels near the Clifford School.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 21, 2010 7:51am

Hi Orange,
Your observations about Hainanese kopitiams and the continuity of the family business is precisely true. The F & B business is not easy to sustain and it does involve hard work and sacrifices. To begin with, it takes time to establish a regular customer base and most food products are perishable. The continuity issue impacts many other types of family business too. The younger generations have their own dreams and aspirations and it is unrealistic to expect them to follow the foot steps of their parents. That is why socioeconomic trends are always evolving in any society. Many of the earlier generations who immigrated to Malaysia worked manual jobs in the towns and villages. Later generations who became successful professionals have the means to move to big cities and swanky neighborhoods. Such trends are also noticeable in most of the Chinatowns in big American cities. Many of the early settlers congregate in Chinatown mainly because of language and job issues. It was difficult to blend into mainstream American society because of communication problems and being among a close-knit community of their own kind, they felt a sense of belonging too. Younger generations who were not held back by communication and cultural barriers became more mobile and successful, and they moved away to the more exclusive suburbs and neighborhoods.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 22, 2010 2:33am

Hi Ken,


It is true that all food products are perishable and it's not easy to establish a regular customer base. Thrift and preseverance are prime ingredients for all our forefathers' businesses. Every cent they earned, they saved. They survived under any environment and surrounding - be it in the fishing village or in the middle of the jungle. I still remember there is one brick house "kedai runcit" along the winding Cameron road. The "kedai runcit" has been there for years. I can remember this particular "kedai runcit" because the name of the shop is my mum's surname.


Our forefathers worked 365 days. Nowadays during CNY, if the fourth day is not suitable to start business, we opt for the 6th or 8th day to start work. Whereas our forefathers starts work on the 2nd of CNY - 2nd day is the safest day to start work because 2nd day of CNY is always auspicous. Some even worked on the 1st day of CNY, because if they did not close for the CNY, it's okay to work on the 1st day. No luxuries and no fancy holidays.


One of our relatives used to have a coffee stall in one of the mining towns in Perak. It was a self-built coffee stall and he made extra rooms at the back the stall for his family to stay. During those hey days of mining era, he worked hard and he was very thrift. He even had a new car during the 50's (very curious to know how did 50's car looked like Smile). His new car was always covered with big canvas and parked under a zinc shed he built. He drove the new car only once a month - to collect rental from his Ipoh shop. Thumbs Up!
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 22, 2010 3:19am

Chinese immigrants certainly left thier mark here in Australia.During the Gold Rush era,1850's,they came from China some landing in South Australia and walking to the Victorian Goldfields,no mean task.Most made thier fortunes not by Gold Mining but by providing goods and services to the Diggers,very astute. A lot of our old Gold Rush towns,like Bendigo,Ballarat and Beechworth still show prominent signs of Chinese influence,Bendigo has the largest Chinese Dragon in the Southern Hemisphere,I believe, and one of Melbournes former Lord's Mayor,Wellington Lee,was of Chinese descent.He also flew in Bombers during WW11 with the RAAF.A very industrious and adaptable people
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 22, 2010 9:49pm

Hi Jim,
Thanks for the informative anecdote about Chinese immigrants in Australia during the Gold Rush era. Likewise, Chinese immigrants flocked to the Gold Mountains (Kam San) of California during the 19th century to make a quick buck, and return home to China to enjoy the fruits of their labor. In reality, many of them ended up as laborers working in the transcontinental railroad construction project. Their lives were often laced with blood, sweat and tears and tragically for some, the Gold Mountains turned out to be a land of broken dreams. The trials and tribulations of early Chinese settlers and the cultural divide that existed between them and their offsprings were very well documented in Amy Tan;s best-selling novel, "The Joy Luck Club". As you have said, these immigrants were very industrious and adaptable, and they were hell-bent to survive, no matter what it takes.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
March 22, 2010 11:40pm

Never read the Novel Ken,but it has now become a must read.Thanks
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 23, 2010 5:56am

Have watched the movie "The Joy Luck Club". It is about mother-daughter relationship. It shows the conflict in thinking between the traditionalist Chinese born in China and ABC. A good movie.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
March 24, 2010 2:45am

Hi Ken,
I was in Jln. Dang Wangi today around lunchtime and noticed that Restoran Yut Kee was full to the brim with locals and caucasians and the kitchen was in full swing. I think the customers would have had a long wait for their food. Maybe 'Iron Chef' might have been able to speed things up a bit. Strangely, a couple of coffeeshops next door were rather empty or as the saying goes 'Phak Wui Ying'. I must try to go there either before or after lunch the next time.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
March 24, 2010 8:29am

The original name for Jalan Dang Wangi was Campbell Road.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
March 24, 2010 7:26pm

Hi Joe,
Restoran Yut Kee's food must be extraordinary to draw such crowds. Perhaps it is not only good but is also inexpensive; that's why the repeat customers are coming back for more because they get good value for their money. Those 'Phak Wu Ying' coffeeshops should emulate Yut Kee and revamp their offerings to cater to customers' taste.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
May 4, 2010 3:38am

Here's a pic of Yut Kee from Joe. Thanks Joe!


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics5/yutkee.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,823
May 4, 2010 3:51am

Is this online curry mee any good? They deliver worldwide?


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics5/onlinecurry.jpg
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 4, 2010 4:06am

Hi Kayes,
I wouldn't want to lose weight at this stage but maybe I'll buy the car number instead.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
May 4, 2010 9:09am

Hi Joe,


Wondering if the Taiping Lim Nyonya Kueh at the Waterfront, Desa Park City originates from Taiping? With the over friendly salesgirl and my over anxious colleagues, I forgot to ask her when we were there. Those nyonya kueh looked quite good. Pandan juices were used instead of artificial colouring. According to my colleagues, less flour should be used on the top layer of the Seri Muka. Bottom layer of the Talam was not that good. But the Kueh Koh Chee santan was superb!


We were supposed to have our dinner at the Korea restaurant but we ate at the Kluang Station instead. Sad


P.S. The salesgirl at the nyonya kueh counter is indeed very friendly. My colleagues were almost 'pengsan'! Smile
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 4, 2010 7:24pm

Hi Orange,
I'm not sure if they originated from Taiping but they have their main shop in Paramount Garden. Personally, I have not tried their kueh because I'm still looking out for the perfect kueh talam and theirs don't fit the bill because the top layer looks a bit too thick. Do let me know if you come across a good kueh talam
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
May 5, 2010 12:57am

Hi Joe,


I think I have offended someone (not intentionally) yesterday. No amount of Nyonya Kueh is sufficient to say SORRY ..... Sad
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
May 5, 2010 2:51am

Haha Orange. What did you do?
BTW I happened to get to the source of where some of the nyonya kueh came from. Its in SEA Park and its run by a person called Ah Han and supplies them to many parts of Klang Valley. Each tray costs around 70 bucks. However, I personally think the nyonya kueh in Ipoh tastes better and cheaper.



Photo Sharing Gallery by PhotoPost
Copyright © 2007 All Enthusiast, Inc.