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Cockman Street
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intriguing name
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Hugh Low Street
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off Hugh Low Street

kayes



Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
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· Date: July 16, 2008 · Views: 21002 ·
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blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
July 22, 2009 3:17am

Kayes, this is just the pic to describe where the famous Wah Nam Ipoh keow teow is located. The coffee shop is immediately to the left of the pic and it is called Kafe Hill Top. It only does evenings and tables are put out around the shop. Ken said that the daughter running the stall is the third generation in the family trade! She told me her father passed away some years ago although he had handed the noodle stall to the daughters years back. Another sister runs the stall in a coffee shop in Greentown Business Centre.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
July 22, 2009 5:22pm

Hi Blue Grass,
Those ladies who run the Ipoh kway teow stall are indeed the 3rd generation in the family business. When I was very young, my mom and dad use to take to Wah Nam and at that time, their grandfather was running the show. Their dad was in his early teens and he was already helping out in the stall then. Later, the grandfather retired and their dad took over the reins of the business. I actually remember seeing the girls at the stall and they literally grew with the business. Now that I know the stall's new location, I will know where to go when I am back in Ipoh for a visit. Back then, Kafe Hill Top was the Inland Revenue Dept. (Jabatan Hasil Dalam Negri) and even at that time, there were many good hawker stalls in that vicinity. Which of the stalls serves better kway teow, the one in Kafe Hill Top or the stall in Greentown Business Centre?
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
July 24, 2009 3:14am

Sorry Ken. I don't think I made myself clear about the location of the Kafe. It is actually out of the pic and it is on the left of the cars and plants. The building in the background was the Inland Revenue Dept and the ground floor is also another coffee shop but it is not the one we want.I went to eat 'Wah Nam' soup noodles again recently and it is just as good as her father's.I think the stall in Greentown Business Centre serves exactly the same kway teow as Kafe Hill Top as it is prepared with the help of their mother.
There are many varieties of food sold at Hill Top - mee Java. satay. nasi lemak. bah kut teh, rojak and more. You will be spoilt for choice! I must say the ice kachang is delicious too.


Do you remember the Wah Nam fried noodles stall that was at the back of the shop? Joe posted something about it under 'Accomodation' Look for it under Hotel Lotte. The coffee shop on the ground floor is run by the son of the pop piah man from Wah Nam.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
July 24, 2009 5:20pm

Hi Blue Grass,
Thanks for clarifying the exact location of Kafe Hill Top. It is not the coffee shop in the ground floor of the former Jabatan Hasil Dalam Negri, and is the shop that is behind those plants and bushes. The variety of street food you mentioned makes me drool and needless to say, a visit to Kafe Hill Top is a 'must' on my next trip home. I do remember Ah Kee's famous fried noodle stall at the rear end of Wah Nam. In those days, one unique feature of this stall is that real crab meat is sprinkled on the noodles before it is served to the customers. I wonder if this is still the practice now.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
July 25, 2009 12:35am

Hi Ken, Ah Kee's style of fried noodles with the real crab meat is not more available. However, the guy who took over the stall has moved to Hotel Lotte's ground floor restaurant and still serves delicious fried noodles minus the crab meat of course. Still taste good esp. with the deep fried lard Sadchee you char).
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
July 25, 2009 5:31am

Hi Joe,
There is no substitute for 'chee yau char' which does give good fried noodles that extra 'oomph'. Though these crunchy pieces of pork fat are not exactly the healthiest food around, I don't think it is any worst than the fried bacon that is found in many western food. Our Malaysian restaurant here does have 'chee yau char' in its 'Tai Loke Meen'. Total abstinence from animal fat is not an easy feat to achieve and I personally believe that moderation is the key.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
July 26, 2009 2:49am

Hi Ken, I totally agree with you that the 'chee yau char' has that extra 'Oomph'. I always request for it whenever I have fried noodles here. There are some good places here in KL which serve good Tai Lok Meen and I'm sure you know where they are.
As for bacon, I love Streaky bacon for its fat and I love having bacon chips in my fried rice at home.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
July 26, 2009 5:40am

Hi Joe and Ken, 'chee yau char' is definitely a must in fried noodles. I remember a dish my mother cooked using mainly 'chee yau char' and 'blimbling' in 'tau cheong' [fermented soy beans]. Blimbling has a rather colourful name in Hokkien - 'too boh leng'.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
July 31, 2009 6:10am

hi Blue Grass, you mean this coffee shop?


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics4/alipit123.jpg
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
July 31, 2009 10:12pm

You got it Kayes! The very coffee shop! Thanks.


There you are Ken, 'Wah Nam Ipoh kway teow' awaits you.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 1, 2009 12:18am

Hi Blue Grass,
So that is the famous Kafe Hill Top where my family's favorite 'Wah Nam Ipoh Kway Teow' is located. Thanks Kayes, your picture is worth more than a thousand words!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 1, 2009 4:37pm

Hi Blue Grass,
Is the 'blimbling' a small, green fruit that has a tart and sourish taste? I have tried a dish just like the one you have described and it is even better when cooked with fresh cut, hot chillies. In Cantonese, the fruit or veggie is called 'suen chai', so I am wondering if it is the 'blimbling' you were referring to. The dish you mentioned is one of the many home-cooked specialties that cannot be ordered from a restaurant menu. Another home-style favorite of mine is roast pork steamed with 'chincharloke' or 'harm har' (salted baby shrimps). Add in some cabai pedas, onions, and a sprinkling of limau juice and I can chow down bowls of rice with it.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
August 2, 2009 7:21am

Hi Ken
Yes, blimbling is 'suen chai' in Cantonese. Do you remember what the fruit looks like? They grow right on the tree trunk. And you are right to say fresh chillies are a must in the dish. All the combined flavours - hot, sour and saltish - make a delicious dish that goes beautifully with rice, like your 'chincharloke'!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 2, 2009 4:43pm

Hi Blue Grass,
I think I can still remember what 'blimbing' looks like. It has a small, slightly longish shape and looks somewhat like the baby cucumbers that are newly formed on the vines. However, I never knew that they grow from the trunk of the tree. Do you have these trees in your garden? We have a very cool summer so far, and the average temp last month was only 69 degrees fahrenheit, setting a new record as one of the coolest July ever. The weather is ideal for flowers but it is not quite warm enough for the veggies to flourish. The hot chillies are doing great and I should have enough of it to blend a whole year's supply of sambal belachan. The kacang panjang and kacang pendek have started to yield but the bitter gourd is yet to flower. Hopefully, August will be warm enough to give the crops one final push before fall sets in.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
August 4, 2009 6:21am

Hi Ken
I do not have a blimbling tree in my garden but my parents had. It is a smallish tree but very fruitful. There were more than we could eat or give away and the fallen fruits on the ground attracted fruit flies. This is the reason I decided not to plant it. The water-jambu [sooi yoong in Cantonese] present the same problem.
It didn't seem so long ago that we talked about the biting cold and your plans for sowing and planting in Spring. And now here we are with your garden in bloom and your vegetable patch about to yield the fruits of your labour. Do hope your plants will flourish and bear fruit as temperatures increase.
We are still living with the haze most days. It is bearable in Ipoh but I do believe it can be bad in KL as it also has to contend with peat fires.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 4, 2009 7:34pm

Hi Blue Grass,
'Sooi Yong; or Jambu Air is an excellent ingredient for rojak. Its crispy and spongy texture is crunchy and chewy, and at the same time, absorbs gravy very well. Jambu Air is available in our Vietnamese grocery shops but it is quite pricey. Is the haze in Malaysia caused by forest fires in Indonesia? Forest fires are a common hazard in some parts of California too and those with respiratory problems should take extra precaution. Hopefully, some seasonal rain will provide respite to the problem soon.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
August 4, 2009 7:57pm

Hi Blue Grass and Ken, the haze in the Klang Valley is really bad and you can literally smell smoke in the air. Its caused by peat fire. It rained this morning but I think it will need a few days of really hard rain to clear the air.
Ken, the 'Sooi Yong' that you mentioned really goes well with rojak. Really love it. Another fruit in season now is cempedak and when its deep fried in batter, you won't be able to stop eating it.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
August 5, 2009 3:06am

hi Ken, here are two pics from Blue Grass showing "blimbing". Thanks Blue Grass Smile


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics4/fruit55.jpg


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics4/fruit66.jpg
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 5, 2009 6:47pm

Thanks Blue Grass and Kayes for the 'Blimbing' pix. In addition to cooking it with 'chee yau char' and 'tau cheung' (fermented soy beans), blimbing can also be eaten as it is, with some salt. I have not seen this fruit for almost 30 years. Thanks again for giving me this opportunity to refresh my memory
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 5, 2009 7:07pm

Hi Joe,
I tend to mix up Cempedak with Jack fruit because they look almost similar, except that one is usually bigger than the other. Jack fruit is the bigger one and Cempedak is the smaller fruit, am I right? If I am not mistaken, the seeds of cempedak can be eaten while the seeds of Jack fruits are not edible. Long, long ago, there was an Indian man selling goreng pisang across from Ruby Cinema. In addition, he also sells fried yam (wu tau) and fried sweet potatoes (faan shee). When cempedak is in season, the best seller is fried cempedak because the pulp is sweet, smooth, and aromatic. Jack fruits are easily available in Vietnamese grocery stores but cempedak is hard to come by.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
August 5, 2009 9:11pm

Hi Ken, Cempedak and Jack fruit (Nangka) look almost similar. There are many stalls here selling fried cempedak and you won't be able to resist the urge to buy it esp. when its freshly fried. Yes, I remember the guy selling goreng pisang at the corner shop opposite Ruby. Not sure if the stall is still around now. There is a stall in Maxwell Rd. selling goreng pisang and sweet potatoes incl. cempedak when in season. I think one main difference is the batter they use to fry.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
August 6, 2009 6:44am

Hi Ken & Joe,


The seeds of both Jack fruit and Cempedak are edible. We boil the Jack fruit seeds whereas for those Cempedak seeds, we fried them together with the flesh of the fruit. When frying Cempedak, we normally remove the seeds and fry three of four "ulas" of "isi Cempedak" dipped in batter to get a better aroma and thicker fried "Cempedak Goreng". SEDAP DAN RANGUP Nah!
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
August 6, 2009 9:02am

Hi, Kayes, Ken, Blue Grass, and Joe.


You guys sure know how to talk up a storm about anything to do with food in Ipoh, which is a good thing seeing that I'll be visiting your shores again in a few months' time.


Thanks to Blue Grass, I now know this fruit is called "blimbling". And all this time I didn't think anyone would know what I'm on about if I were ever to try describing that yummy homecooked dish Blue Grass mentioned! Because I'd never eaten nor seen this particular dish anywhere else outside of my late mum's kitchen and on our dinner table, I'd mistakenly thought it was a dish she had whipped up herself. I feel so silly now. Does anyone know if this dish has a name to it?
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
August 6, 2009 6:35pm

Well hello Phoebe. What a pleasant surprise. It has been a long time and your absence has been keenly felt! We do hope to keep on hearing from you.


Food as you know is a perennial favourite subject in IT and with foodies like Joe, we are able to find the best food in town, be it in Ipoh, Penang or KL.



The 'blimbling' dish with the 'chee yau char' is served in many Hokkien homes. I do not remember the name of this dish but will ask an elderly aunt. Let you know soon.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
August 6, 2009 6:41pm

Hi Phoebe, Glad to have you back on IT.


Many moons have come and gone
Glad to have you back where you belong.


The Belimbing dish with loads of Chee Yau Char is something to die for. I must look out for it in the market tomorrow, failing which we'll have to text Blue Grass to supply us with some.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 6, 2009 7:20pm

Hi Phoebe,
Apa khabar? Sudah lama tak jumpa! Foodies like Joe, Blue Grass and Orange are constantly feeding me with the most up-to-date info about all the makanan sedap that has evolved in our motherland ever since I left its beloved shores. Indeed, food is a subject that brings out the latent and deep-seated passion in us. Just talking and reminiscing about it makes me feel so much closer to the land of my birth. In this respect, I am extremely grateful to my friends in Ipohtalk because their frequent updates have helped to keep me abreast with the latest development in the food scene in Malaysia. It's great to hear from you again, and best wishes to you and your family.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 7, 2009 5:55am

Hi Orange,
Thanks for the info about the seeds of Jack fruits. I never knew these hard-as-rocks parts of the fruit can be eaten. The next time I buy Jack fruits, I will know what to do with the seeds. Before boiling the seeds, seasoning it with a dash of salt may perhaps make it more tasty.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
August 8, 2009 9:06pm

Durian Seeds are edible,also,when roasted
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
August 9, 2009 11:41am

Hi Ken,


You are right, the seeds will definitely taste better with a dash of salt added. Nah!


Those 'nangka' and 'cempedak' seeds resemble rubber seeds. We have a family friend who is a planter used to bring rubber seeds for us to play while we were kids. We play 'Batu Seremban' or seven stones with those rubber seeds. Not sure if you have seen kids playing Batu Seremban before. Smile
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 10, 2009 9:42pm

Hi Orange,
During my time, the boys main 'gasing' (tops) and 'guli' (marbles), while the girls main 'batu seremban' (with small, smooth stones) and 'masak masak'. Children's games were very basic and primitive at that time, and hand-held electronic games were unheard of in those days. Nevertheless, the kids had loads of fun with what they have and I am sure many of those games have become 'extinct'.
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
August 11, 2009 4:19am

Hi Ken,


Kids today still play Batu Seremban. As for we adults, we still like to play "layang-layang". We have collected many kites with various designs and colours. The nearest place to go for this childhood game of ours is at Bagan Lalang if we can't find the time to travel far. Senorok!! Thumbs Up!
wongfam

Registered: August 2008
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 19
August 12, 2009 10:29pm

Hi Ken,did you used to play a game called Liu Chye,which consists of two sticks.Just came back from my Europe and Malaysian trips and it was lovely to spent some time back home and savouring some of the home food but unfortunately didnt try any of the places that Joe recommends,just didnt have the time.Overall food places in Ipoh and also Kampar are much better and cheaper than those in KL.Have anyone being to the Hakka Restaurant in KL.Was rather disappointing not like it used to be.Ipoh Pusing Mun Choong still delivers excellent food ,went there twice when i was back in Ipoh
Ken when r u going to Europe soon i think,do have a great time,its rather more expensive in certain parts of Europe,found UK prices are reasonable.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 13, 2009 6:38pm

Hi Stan,
Glad to know that you had an enjoyable trip. I am green with envy that you were able to stop over in the old country on your way home to Australia. No such luck for me though. I have to be back in time for my kid to start school in early September. Besides, Malaysia is not along the route from Europe to the US. I'll have to make a detour If I were to make that side trip. We will be leaving for Holland on Aug. 21st and our trip ends in Rome on Sept. 4th. How's the weather in Europe? I understand this summer is exceptionally hot, but a friend who just returned from France said that it is still advisable to have a light jacket handy at night. The cost of living is definitely higher in Europe and needless to say, it pays to be watchful of the prices when we are on the road. How's the food? Is there anything to shout about?


Hakka Restaurant in KL was very famous in the 70's and at that time their kangkong fried with belachan was extremely popular. I am not sure if the restaurant is still so hot now, since you said the quality of the food has deteriorated. Mun Choong in Pusing has always been on top of its game, but what about Mun Choong in Ipoh (behind Lido in Horley Street)? Is it any good? Kampar does have very good food and in those days, when I am bored with Ipoh's food, I'll drive 24 miles to have supper in Kampar. With the north south expressway, the distance must have been shortened tremendously. Yes, I do know the game 'liu chye' and I have got whacked before by those flying sticks that whizzed by ever so quickly and forcefully.
wongfam

Registered: August 2008
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 19
August 15, 2009 6:43am

Hi Ken,Europe was nice n food is good too esp.in Rome.Are you doing the trip on your own with your family or package tour?Good way to get round is by buying the Hop ON and Hop off buses.They are good value as you can stop om n off when you want it.If you do need any more info dont hestitate to ask.
Wishing you n family an enjoyable trip to Europe.Chinese food in Europe are not that flash.If you are going to London then try some of the restaurants in Bayswater area esp.the one call Gold Mine,they do serve an excellent Lobster with Noodles dish.There is one good malaysian restaurant in China Town call Rasa Sayang just off Gerrard Street(china town main street)
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 15, 2009 3:05pm

Hi Stan,
Thanks for all the useful info. Our modus operandi is to tour the 'free-n-easy' way on our own because it gives us the freedom to select what we are interested in seeing and can do it at our own pace. We bought the 3-day city passes for London and Paris online, which gives us access to most of the popular attractions. I think the 'hop on & hop off' buses are a great way to see the city and we may do just that in Rome, Barcelona and Venice. After covering one attraction, is there a long wait before we can hop onto another bus for the next attraction? Are there long lines at most of the tourist destinations? It seems the recession has affected the tourist industry in Europe. Hopefully we don't have to waste unnecessary time waiting in endless queues and traveling in between attractions. Rasa Sayang Restaurant sounds very enticing indeed. We'll be there for sure!
wongfam

Registered: August 2008
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 19
August 17, 2009 2:54am

Hi Ken,most of the hop on hop off stops are good and runs 20 minutes between time.There are always long queue waiting to get in to places eg The Vatican,Colisium etc especially with security.If you havent make any booking for Rome,try www.terravision.eu/rome_ciampino.html,they do offer a Vatican n 3dayhop on hop off plus inside vatican for 49 euro per adult n 19Euro for a child.Its a very nice n friendly service.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
August 17, 2009 4:47am

Hi Ken
You and family will be leaving soon for Europe and all of us from Ipoh Talk would like to wish you Happy Holidays!
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
August 17, 2009 6:24am

Hi Ken,


A very happy holidays to you and family too!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 17, 2009 10:08pm

Hi Blue Grass and Orange,
Thanks for the good wishes! It is a trip that was in the works for a while and my wife did all the planning and bookings online. This has been a stressful year and we all needed a timely break to recharge and rejuvenate physically, as well as mentally. While we are about to embark on this trip, our thoughts are already on next summer's vacation and Asia is not far from our mind. Thanks again!
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
August 17, 2009 10:24pm

Hi Stan,
Thanks for the 'hop on & hop off' suggestion for Rome. The deal looks very reasonable and we may just go for it. I guess we will have to make an early head start to cover the popular attractions and hopefully, the queues will not be that long. We managed to track down some relatives and friends in London and Paris and catching up with them is like the icing on the cake. Your advice and insights about vacationing in Europe were useful and we appreciate it.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
September 6, 2009 7:00am

Hi Stan,
Your 'hop on & hop off' suggestion for Rome worked very well for us and we covered the Vatican, St. Peter's Basilica and Sistine Chapel with minimal delay. It was an exhausting trip because we wanted to cover as much ground as possible with the time we have. Nevertheless, it was well worth it despite blistered feet and deprived sleep. We met some Malaysians and Singaporeans along the way and bonded with them immediately. A side trip to Montserrat, a retreat operated by the Benedictine monks in the mountains near Barcelona was fascinating. The views were spectacular and the ride on the funicular railway reminds me of Penang Hill. Another side trip to explore the ruins of old Pompeii, which was destroyed many centuries ago by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius was also breathtaking. In London, we tried the Malaysian restaurants that you and ACS 77 mentioned. The food was not bad, especially the beef rendang and kueh kak (fried carrot cake in cubes), which were outstanding.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,807
September 7, 2009 3:35am

hi Ken, welcome back to Ipoh Talk after your European holiday Smile I hope to drive across the Alps one more time soon.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
September 7, 2009 12:48pm

Thanks Kayes! Sounds like your yearning for adventure is strong and there is still a lot of fire in your belly. I am sure you are up to the challenge to drive across the Alps.



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