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[ Butterflies & All Things Beautiful ]
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[ New Town ]
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Concubine Lane (Pang
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ipohdec16
Panglima Lane aka Concubine Lane aka Yee Nai Hong

kayes



Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
users gallery
This historic enclave is heading for imminent collapse. I don't think anyone in Ipoh is interested to save this bit of rich history. There are at least 6 to 7 empty houses where the rain water pours into the building and the walls have big cracks. Floor boards and windows are broken and plants are growing into the concrete. Pitiful sight and nobody cares.
· Date: December 30, 2008 · Views: 18692 ·
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kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
December 30, 2008 2:18am

http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/ipohdec20.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
December 30, 2008 2:20am

http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/ipohdec21.jpg
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
December 30, 2008 8:30am

Kayes,


Thanks for capturing such graphic real-life shots of "Yi Lai Hong" (Concubine Lane) as they now stand. It's a real shame that these steep-in-Ipoh-history houses have been allowed to deteriorate to such an appalling state. From the looks of the first picture, it is not hard to see that they are doomed for eventual demolition sooner or later. How sad. Sad
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
December 30, 2008 5:56pm

Kayes,
It is regrettable that a slice of Ipoh's fabled past is going down the drain and future generations will never be able to see these vanishing sights that are so endearing to us. Certain historic parts of the city should be gazetted for preservation as a 'heritage corridor' for reasons of posterity. If these dilapidated shop houses are not restored, it will be lost forever. Hopefully, it is not too late for farsighted individuals to come up with some development plans to revive this quaint part of the city. Look at what the authorities in Melaka have done to Heeren & Jonker Streets! The whole area is closed to traffic and stalls are set up to sell ethnic food, handicrafts and other tourists paraphernalia. That section of the city has been gentrified and it is packed with locals as well as tourists. Compared to Melaka, Ipoh is a much bigger city, with a larger population base. If the developers can start business ventures along the banks of Kinta River, they should take a second look at Panglima Lane and give it another chance to survive.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
December 30, 2008 6:12pm

Phoebe & Ken, I have been taking pics of Panglima Lane almost every other month for the past 7 years or so. That little lane is so charming and intriguing to me. As I walk through it I can feel the history and almost relive it. When I peeped into those empty houses, I had fleeting visions of opium dens, gambling tables (probably "pai kow") .... and pretty ladies. A mini Shanghai right in Ipoh. Those businessmen who have made so much money from Ipoh should consider paying some back by joining forces to preserve this historical enclave.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
December 30, 2008 7:32pm

Kayes and Ken,


Is Panglima Lane where that enterprising street storyteller used to spin his copious yarns about China and its folklore in the evenings to neighbourhood kids who came armed with copper (1- and 2-cent) coins? He would start his yarn-spinning with the burning of a joss-stick until it burned out. And, he'd stop his storytelling abruptly until his by-then suitably enthralled audience dropped coins into a collection tin at his feet. He'd then burn another joss-stick to resume his storytelling. And on he'd go night after night. A busker by any other name ...


Decades later, whenever the mood took her, my late mum would spice up some of those yarns as she spun them out to us kids before bedtime. One of the stories purportedly told by the street storyteller was about the 'Red Man' who went around stealing children off the street and eating them alive. I remember being so frightened out of my wits with this particular story that I'd pull the blanket over my head in bed and shut my eyes tight until I fell asleep. Yet, we would keep pestering her for more every night. Silly kids we were. Smile
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
December 30, 2008 7:54pm

Phoebe, this story teller is someone I vaguely remember. I can recall having seen him perform in the old town area when I was still in school and my mother would re-tell the stories to me in simpler terms as he spun his yarns in a "sing song" tone, often in "deep Cantonese". Truly the original busker. How I wish I can find an old pic of him performing somewhere in Old Town. I am sure somebody will have one. Just have to keep on looking.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
December 30, 2008 8:24pm

Kayes, that's the same storyteller! He must have been a very old man by the time you saw him. Did he still have his wooden stool and collection tin with him then? And importantly, can you recall some of the stories retold by your mum? My late mum was living along Lau Ek Ching Street during the late '40s and early '50s so she was part of his young audience.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
December 31, 2008 3:44pm

Kayes & Phoebe, the tale about the storyteller who captivates his listeners with yarns of enthralling folklore is indeed fascinating. I have definitely heard about this 'spin meister' before, but I cannot pinpoint from whom or where. Roadside storytellers are integral links in the chain of communication within every culture. I remember seeing them in action during Chicago's International Busking Festival and like the young audience that were standing beside me, I was totally enraptured by their skills. Sadly, these storytellers are a dying breed in Malaysia, and I don't think there are many around these days. In the 60's, when TV and Reddifusion has yet to invade Malaysian airwaves, a famous storyteller use to spin yarns of kungfu and historical epics on the radio. His name is Lee Dai Saw and he became a household favorite long before the 'Empat Sekawan' gang gained fame on Radio Malaya. After he died, many wannabe storytellers tried to fill his shoes but none of them had quite the same impact like Lee did. That was so long ago that I almost forgot about this well-known radio personality.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
December 31, 2008 10:19pm

It is indeed,a tragedy when such Icons,dis-appear.In fact they take history with them.Maybe we should realise this? instead of offering only ridicule,as some,I emphasise some,of todays youth seem to do.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 1, 2009 8:15pm

Phoebe & Ken, I was very young when I saw that storyteller. Maybe just 5 or 6 years old and that would send us back 60 years. I now remember one of our relatives had a Chinese medicine shop along Hugh Low Street and that was most probably the place where I used to see the storyteller because sometimes my mother and I would spend the evenings there.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 1, 2009 8:33pm

Kayes,


Thanks for jogging my memory. I'd completely forgotten about those Chinese medicine shops (or "Chinese medical halls" as some of them were called back then) along Hugh Low Street. The three that I can recall are Eu Yan Sang, Ban Choon Tong and Yin Woh Tong. I wonder if the last two are still around. As for Eu Yan Sang, I've seen a couple of its outlets in KL in recent times.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 1, 2009 8:45pm

Phoebe, my relative's shop was Yin Foh Tong and it was near the bridge in Old Town. There was a change of ownership and the shop closed a long time ago. Eu Yan Sang has their own building in Leech Street. I can't recall Ban Choon Tong.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 1, 2009 8:53pm

Kayes, I'm not familiar at all with your relative's Yin Foh Tong in Old Town. Ban Choon Tong and Yin Woh Tong were both on Hugh Low Street in New Town. Hup Yik Optical was nearby to them.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 1, 2009 9:08pm

Oops! Now I get confused. I would think that despite we spelling the name differently, "Yin Foh Tong" and "Yin Woh Tong" are one and the same. I spelt it as "Yin Foh Tong" because they had a branch in Kuala Kangsar called "Yin Foh Chan" and that Kuala Kangsar branch closed only sometime in 1997 I think. Each time I drove past KK I could see their signboard "Yin Foh Chan" and so I followed that same spelling in the case of "Yin Foh Tong". I remember Yin Foh Tong as being just after the bridge on the Old Town side but is my memory playing tricks on me? Was it just after the bridge on the New Town side?
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 1, 2009 9:20pm

I think we are talking about two different medical halls despite the similarity in their names. Yin Woh Tong was in either the first or second block of shops from the New Town police station (and on the same side of the street as the police station).
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 1, 2009 9:29pm

I think it is the same medical hall we are talking about but I am talking about Yin Foh Tong in the late 40s and early 50s. Could it be they were at Old Town then? And then moved to New Town to near the police station? Will investigate further into this Smile The chap who ran Yin Foh Chan in Kuala Kangsar will know. I will try to find him next time I am in KK.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 1, 2009 9:41pm

You're probably right on the money there, Kayes. Talking about KK, do you ever stop by at a small village/town called Manong? My grandparents lived there at some stage in the '50s and early '60s. They had a couple of durian plantations in Bruas. All I can recall of Manong was this really tall, huge tree with white bark. And the Leyland bus we were on had to cross some rickety wooden bridge over the Perak River not long after KK to get to Manong.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 1, 2009 9:59pm

If you drive on the A road from Penang to Ipoh, you will pass Kuala Kangsar but not Manong which is about 40 minutes east from KK. My father used to take us on long Sunday drives and one of the places we went to often was Manong where he had a friend who opened some kind of haberdashery shop. It used to be a "Communist area" and there would be many police/army roadblocks along the way.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 1, 2009 10:17pm

Oh, I do remember the haberdashery shop. Come to think of it, there was only one long block of shops in Manong. The huge tree was across the road from one end of the row of shops. Out the front of that corner shop near the tree used to be a stall run by an old lady who sold Cincau ("Leong fun" or black grass jelly) drinks with shaved ice. That was in the '50s or early '60s. My last visit there was during my 1997 trip. Despite the passage of time, the place still looked the same then.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 2, 2009 7:36am

Pheobe, is Ban Choon Tong the medical hall that has a gold fish as its logo? or a product that they sells has a gold fish logo, as this logo appears on their shop signage.


If this is the shop, then they have moved to one of the side streets pependicular to Hugh Low St, nearer to the old central market is located.


I remember it well as my parents frequent it regularly and were friends with one of the daughters-in-law. We nicknamed her 'gold fish' auntie, not being disrespectful thou', its for ease of reference. As you know, everyone is an uncle or aunty in Malaysia and Singapore!
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 2, 2009 11:30pm

Hi, Hokin.
Yes, I think you're absolutely spot on. Thanks for jogging my memory about the gold fish logo which I can now recall seeing on Ban Choon Tong's (monthly) calendars in the '70s!


Your comment about the 'gold fish auntie' made me smile. It's so true about the good old days during our childhood when we called everyone who's much older than us 'Uncle' or 'Aunty'. The first time I was called by my Christian name by a 5-year-old who lived next-door came as a bit of a rude shock. Took me awhile but I gradually got used to it so it's like water off a duck's back these days. Smile
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 2, 2009 11:55pm

I always thought that Yin Foh Tong was somewhere here in Old Town. In pic below, on the left where the "Minyak Angin Cap Kapak" sign is. That sign would indicate there is another Chinese Medical Hall there. Must take a good look next trip.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/minyak.jpg
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 3, 2009 3:02am

Yes, indeed, depending on which part of the western world you are located, kids will call older people by their first names, this is no doubt in the layback Australia.


As I know it, in the bible belt states of the US, some of them are still pretty formal, by addressing everyone Sir or Maam and some even call their dad by Mr. so and so. Some of my American colleagues will still call us by Sir or Maam and some others calls each other by our first names. Perhaps some of our US friends can enlighten us further.


When I was residing and working in London, it was by first name basis.


One thing that I dislike about Malaysia and Singapore, is that business people call their Chinese colleagues or business associates by their surnames, like 'Chan','Wong' etc. I find this disrespectful without the Mr or Ms infront. and the other thing about Malaysians and Singaporeans is that when they introduce themselves, they call themselve 'Ms. Chen' or 'Mr. Chin', which no one from a western country will call themselves with the prefix 'Mr'or 'Ms'. They will just say I am 'Smith, K C Smith or Kenneth Smith'.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 3, 2009 7:36am

Hi, Hokin.


What was interesting was that the 5-year-old and her young sibling, who called me by my first name right from the word go, were from the house left of our fence. The 9-year-old who lived in the house on our right called me "Aunty Phoebe". Both households were as 'dinky di' Aussie as they come. And when my kids were still at school, their mates who came over to visit always called me "Mrs Smith". When I was teaching two different forms at a Catholic high school, the kids had no choice but. Smile


Then, when I was advocating for a pair of twins in Toronto, they started off addressing me as "Aunty Phoebe" and before my work there was done, we were on first-name terms. And years later, in both San Francisco and Sacramento, I was "Ms Smith".


As for colleagues and bosses I had worked with in Malaysia, bar the last organisation where everyone went by his/her first name, it was the same old "Miss this" or "Mr that". It was no different when I worked for a pompous Scottish boss in Melbourne. He was, however, just an exception to the rule because in every other Aussie workplace I'd been with before and since, first names were the norm.


And, to muddy the waters, we call our current Prime Minister "Kevin" but his predecessor "Mr Howard". Smile
January 3, 2009 8:04am

dear kayes
Pl let me know if punglima street and panglima lane are separate or they are same
subra
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 3, 2009 8:26am

Kayes, the Axe-brand "minyak angin" is surely one of the staples one finds in a typical Chinese first-aid kit in Malaysia. Oh, make that in Australia, too. Smile


I seem to recall that there were at least two Chinese medical halls in Old Town in the '70s. Problem is I can't remember their names even though one of them was owned by the Tung family, a distant relative of ours.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 6:52am

Subra, I have not heard of a Panglima Street. Only Panglima Lane.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 6:58am

Phoebe, talking about "foong yau", do you remember Ng Loong Kee? Wasn't Loong Kee the heir to some foong yau fortune? Goldfish brand? I knew him as he was also driving Alfa Romeos in the 70s. I also used to bowl with him at the Perak Turf Club Sports Club in Tiger Lane.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 7:11am

Kayes, I had to read it twice and say it out loud before the penny dropped. Ohh, "foong yau"! (Nodding vigorously here) Smile! No, I'm not familiar with the name Ng Loong Kee. Maybe, Hokin knows him if he's in any way related to the Goldfish brand?
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 7:20am

Loong Kee has passed away now. He was 3 or 4 years older than me. He married a Miss Malaysia, Josephine Lena Wong. I vaguely remember he was the heir to an Ipoh foong yau fortune but I can't remember which brand. In the 70s he was a very flamboyant figure in Ipoh.
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 7:38am

Hope Hokin can help out here with this Goldfish brand mystery. Smile


Josephine Lena Wong Jaw Leng (ex-Main Convent) was Miss Malaysia in 1970. She remarried and is now known as Datin Josephine Fonseka. I remember seeing her on one of the TV commercials for some washing machine where she was busy painting her toe nails while her laundry was being mechanically taken care of in the background! Her daughter is Andrea Fonseka, Miss Malaysia 2004.


And talking about "foong yau" again, do you remember "hoi gau yau" (seal oil)?
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 7:50am

Phoebe, Josephine's second husband was the Chief Medical Officer in Penang for some time and I used to bump into them at the Penang Club or Penang Swimming Club. I saw a pic of her daughter in the papers and she is even prettier than mom Smile I remember hoi gau yau but I don't think I have ever used it. Is it used like foong yau?
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 8:29am

Kayes, the term "hoi gau yau" suddenly came to me when I was saying "foong yau" out loud a few minutes ago! Smile! No idea what it's used for, though, as I've never used it. But I occasionally still use Tiger Balm and "Siang Pure Oil" for muscular pains.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
January 6, 2009 12:55pm

Hi Phoebe & Kayes,


As for medicated oil, my favorite has always been Kwan Loong which was originated from Ipoh. It is available here in the US in Chinese supermarkets. I carry the smallest bottle of this medicated oil and have introduce them to my many caucasian friends and they love it. My caucasian wife uses it more than anyone I know. It really comes in handy during the allergy seasons, here in the US.


ACS77
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 2:31pm

hi Sam, I think you got it!!! Loong Kee inherited the Kwan Loong fortune. This foong yau has a "double lion" as its logo and so it is different from the Goldfish brand or Kapak brand. The Kwan Loong brand is now owned by Haw Par of Singapore which also makes Tiger Balm. In huge crowds overseas I think it would be quite easy to pick out Malaysians. Just follow the scent of of foong yau. I use it whenever I feel I have a cold coming. I take out my handkerchief, tie a knot and pour some foong yau on to the knot and then I sniff it for half a day or so and the cold is gone Smile
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
January 6, 2009 3:46pm

Hi Kayes,


It's interesting how we were taught to do things a certain way. I tie a knot too and my wife will ask me why do I do that ? My answer, so that I know which corner of the handkerchief I have placed the foong yau : )


Many of my American friends love this Kwan Loong Oil and had offer to pay me for it.


ACS77
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 4:52pm

My first aid kit.


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/minyak2.jpg
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 5:45pm

These two bottles belong to Phoebe. Thanks Phoebe!


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/minyak6.jpg
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 7:39pm

Hi, Sam and Kayes.


Yes, "Kwan Loong Foong Yau" is the name of the other brand of medicated oil I kept trying to recall but without success due to OldTimer's Disease! Smile Not sure if they are sold in Asian shops here in Oz but will look out for them next time I pop into my regular shop. As the picture shows, I've stuck to using the "Foo Tao Mug Foong Yau". I bought them in Ipoh on one of my trips back. It's funny, isn't it, that no matter where we now find ourselves living, we still swear by these traditional cures for common ailments like the sniffles, blocked nose, nausea, "pening kepala", "sakit perut", "sakit urat", colds, etc. And yes, I even taught my older son when he was a few years old how to tie the corner knot using his hanky and putting a few drops of the "foong yau" on it. And you should have seen the looks on my in-laws' faces when I wrapped a still-hot boiled egg in a folded hanky and proceeded to gently roll it over my son's bruised leg! Smile!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 8:14pm

oops! Sorry Phoebe, I posted the wrong pic you sent. This one is Phoebe's real first aid kit. I seriously think all soldiers in any army should carry this stuff in their backpacks Smile!


http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/minyak7.jpg
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 9:06pm

Haha, Kayes. By the looks of our personal First Aid kits, it seems I'm a lot sicker than you! Or, put another way, you're much healthier than me. Smile!
Phoebe
Land Down Under

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 447
January 6, 2009 9:19pm

Kayes, I forgot to ask what the 555 book is for. I haven't clapped eyes on one of those for decades! I remember them in just plain colours, though. Do you keep all your magic cure-alls and traditional remedies in it? Smile
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 6, 2009 11:04pm

Phoebe, I see you have a lot of powerful cures there Smile! Having first aid kits like yours and mine, I would prefer to think we are well prepared for all eventualities and it is not a question of the state of our health. I like your Tiger Balm Oil as it looks really potent and I can see the "Poison" warning on the bottle. Have you ever tried boarding a plane with it? My 555 notebook is used in conjunction with my Chifa Book. I jot down all important numbers in the 555 book. Numbers of the hotel rooms I stayed in, numbers of taxis I used, numbers of certain IP Addresses that visit my websites, birthdays etc etc. Then I cross refer between the Chifa and 555 books. By the way, I think the 555 notebook I have is an imitation. Like you say, the original should be in plain colours and the paper quality of the original is something like joss paper. The one I bought is just too refined.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
January 8, 2009 12:27pm

Hi Kayes & Phoebe,


My basic Malaysian First-Aid Kit consist of Kwan Loong Medicated Oil, Salonpas and "Po Chi Pills".


ACS77
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
January 9, 2009 2:04am

Kayes, Phoebe and ACS77, from the pics of your First-Aid Kits to what you profess to use for your aches and pains, I was reminded of the traveling Traditional Medicine man drawn in Lat's books. He would set up a screen to show a movie in a Malay kampung or Chinese New Village and at the most exciting part stop the movie and promote his ointments, oils and plasters amidst loud groans from the children!
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 9, 2009 9:39pm

Hi Kayes and all, its been quite a while since I Last posted on Ipohtalk. First of all, a Very Happy New Year to everyone.
I would like to add something to the first aid kit and that is 'Tan Ngan Low' leong char which is a cooling tea. Most of us feel heaty at times so its good to drink it once in a while although some take beer instead. 'Kwai Low Leong Char' as some refer to it. There is also another kind of ailment for upset tummy which is 'Foong Sar Yeen' pills that can settle this problem. These help to treat ourselves when the doctor is not around.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 9, 2009 10:01pm

Hi Joe, good to see you back Smile Hope things are more settled for you now. Is Tan Ngan Loh an Ipoh product?
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
January 9, 2009 10:06pm

Hi Joe
A very Happy New Year to you and family too. You have certainly been missing in action for some time. Been using your 'Chifa' book much? Here is wishing all 'Chifa' members good luck and good fortune in 2009!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 9, 2009 10:21pm

Blue Grass, I have a story to tell. The other day I stayed in a hotel and the room number was 731. I had thought of buying that number but forgot. Anyway, two days later in the Da Ma Cai draw, the first prize was 730!!! By the way, according to the Chifa Book, 731 is "sewing" while 730 is "traffic police".
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
January 9, 2009 10:52pm

I was thoroughly amused and bemused by your story Kayes. A little in awe too of the 'almost there' situation. I'm not into numbers but this seems a bit uncanny!
Good luck and good fortune to you too!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 9, 2009 10:56pm

If only they had given me Room 730 and if only I had remembered to buy!
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 9, 2009 11:38pm

Hi Kayes, Tan Ngan Loh is an Ipoh product. They started small in a terrace house behind my place and now I see it sold almost everywhere. This is getting more popular than Hor Yan Hor tea. Works real fine.
Hi Blue Grass, yes, I have been rather busy lately and only got to log on today. My chifa book is still active and hoping to strike a bit this year LOL.
I have been sniffing around looking for good places to eat lately.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
January 10, 2009 9:20am

Hi Joe,
Blue Grass is right, you have been unusually quiet for a while. Hope all is fine and you have a great start to the new year. Tan Ngan Loh's cooling tea is quite popular indeed. I can get it online from some Malaysian food vendors and certain shops in Chinatown carry it too. Long ago, Poh Chai Yuen (pills) was also a popular remedy for diarrhea and stomach upset. Are these pills being used today? I am glad to hear that you are still actively sniffing around for good 'makan' places. This line from Lord Alfred Tenneyson's poem "Ulyses" does apply to your ongoing effort, -'to seek, to find, and not to yield'. Carry on sniffing and please keep us posted with your latest discoveries.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 10, 2009 3:43pm

Poh Chai pills are still popular and there are other variants too, like the cap helang. Poh Chai pills originate from Hong Kong and it is still made there. If you go to Hong Kong airport, you can get them there. I got my last supply there!


The other popular herbal remedy tea is Ho Yan Hor, which hails from Ipoh, which you can now get them in tea bags and has a variety of flavours. Ho Yan Hor as a company is now called Hovid, a relatively large pharmaceutical company, listed on the Malaysia Stock Exchange. Their art deco building in Old Town as I know it is still standing.
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 10, 2009 8:36pm

http://penangnewspaper.com/pics3/pilchi.jpg
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 11, 2009 3:20am

Indeed, my cap helang is chi-kit teck aun. Thanks Kayes.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 15, 2009 1:20am

Hi Ken & Blue Grass,
Yes, I haven't been on Ipohtalk for quite a while as I just moved to KL. I just got my streamyx transfered today and could only log on now. Anyway I've been sniffing around the KL/PJ area and found some interesting places to eat.
The Poh Chai pills are still in the market here and selling well too.
Kayes, from the above pic. showing the pil chi-kit teck aun, I'm wondering if the pasar mini is spelled 'Big Fort' or is it 'BIG FART'. LOL
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
January 15, 2009 1:29am

Joe, that was what attracted me to the shop in the first place. I took the pic in Awana while cruising around looking for a place to have lunch. From afar I saw the shop's signboard (the bigger sign on the first floor) stating "BIG FORT" which my aging eyes actually read as "BIG FART" and on driving closer I saw the poh chai yeen and I almost burst out laughing. How apt Smile!
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 15, 2009 6:35am

Joe, no doubt Ipoh will miss you. Hope you will enjoy the big cities of KL and PJ. There is a KL outlet of the Ipoh coffeeshop(Sun Yun Long)in Aman Suria (near Taman Megah Mas and Tropicana), their white coffee is the closest I can find in KL for Ipoh white coffee.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 15, 2009 3:30pm

Hi Hokin, Thanks for the info. I'm often in the Aman Suria area so I will definitely give this shop a try. I found a few happening eating places in Dataran Sunway in Kota Damansara and they've got lots of choices there. I'm still sampling to see which stalls are the best. App' their Chee Yoke Fun (pork noodles) are quite good and cheap.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
January 15, 2009 9:01pm

Hi Joe,
Finally, you have succumbed to the bright lights in the big city. All the best to you, and I am sure everything will be fine and dandy. Ipoh is just a two hour drive away. I am sure you will be back when you yearn for the hometown goodies. Besides, KL has a lot to offer too when it comes to food. Many famous hawkers from all over the country, literally speaking, the cream of the crop, have relocated to the federal capital in search of greener pastures. There will never be a dearth of good food in KL but do continue to keep us posted with all that is happening in Ipoh whenever you can.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 16, 2009 4:17am

Hokin, I checked out the shop Sun Yun Long today. Actually, I went there a couple of times before but I never noticed the name of the shop. Yes, they have Ipoh White Coffee there and even have an advertisement of it in front of the shop. As for the food, I prefer the shop Restaurant City Sun on the main road of Aman Suria facing the NKVE. The chicken rice and char siew/siew yoke is superb while the other things like char koay tiau looks good too.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 16, 2009 4:26am

Thanks Ken. Yes, Ipoh is just a two hour drive and I do go back as often as I can for my gigs and also to catch up on the Ipoh goodies. Besides, half my time was spent in KL before this as my two sons are based here. I was told by my friend, a Star columnist, that I can get real Ipoh kind of food in Damansara Uptown and she has promised to take me there soon. I'm also checking out some food blogs to see where are the good places. Will let you guys in on it.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
January 16, 2009 11:18pm

Joe,if I may,you seem to be somewhat of a Gourmet as well as a Musician?My niece and her Husband,some 7 years back,took me to a place in KL where we ate Roti Pisang with curry gravy and boiled eggs,no relevance to the pills mentioned earlier,I have never seen this before,though I am sure it is probably very common.Nor have I seen it since.I have to say it was very tasty,though I can't remember where it was.My Niece's Husband also took me to a place to eat Bahkut Teh,of which I am a fan,He loved it and so did I but his Wife would not come with us because she did not like Bahkut Teh.Uhmm,I wish I could taste both now.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 17, 2009 1:53am

Hi Jim, thanks. I just love going around looking for great places to eat. The Roti Pisang is a dessert found in mamak shops. The guy will spread the uncooked roti canai over his pan, add some margarine and sugar and finally cut slices of banana and fold it. It will take a couple of minutes and served to you with curry which is optional. I once brought an Australian lady friend to have it and she just loved it.
There are lots of places that serve good Bak Kut Teh. Actually, you can buy the Bak Kut Teh sachets found in Asian grocers and cook it yourself. Some popular brands are 'Wonderful' and 'A1' and I'm sure there are many more brands which are just as good. Come to think of it, I feel like having some now. Maybe I;ll head out to my favourite place in Damansara Uptown for some.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
January 17, 2009 7:17am

Hi Joe,
It's good to know that Damansara Uptown is famous for Ipoh-style hawker food. I have to remember that because I do spend quite a bit of time in KL/PJ when I am back in Malaysia. As for the Bak Kut Teh sachets, it's easily available in our Asian grocery stores. My favorite brands are A1 and Hup Loong, and I am well-stocked with these in my pantry because I always load up when I am back in Malaysia. There is also a chicken version called Chi Kut Teh and it's not bad too. Now that you are in KL, you should take a short drive to Klang, the Bak Kut Teh capital of the world. There, the preparation of Bak Kut Teh has been elevated to an art form and with so many stalls to choose from, it is mind-boggling. Back in KL, there is also a very good Bak Kut Teh place in Jalan Alor. I like to enjoy my Bak Kut Teh with a garlicky/chili padi dip, and it is even better when served with rice that is cooked with yam. In Melaka, there was a stall beside the old Capitol Cinema that served Bak Kut Teh that way.
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
January 17, 2009 2:24pm

Ah yes Ken the garlic/padi dip and also the long sort of rolls,pardon me I forget what they are called.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
January 17, 2009 4:29pm

Jim, Ken


Are you talking about Yau Char Quay? It is yummy with Bah Kut Teh. All these talk about food makes me want to take the next flight back to Ipoh for some of these delicious food !!! Actually, not to worry. A former ACS classmate will be visiting from Shanghai next week and he is planning to bring some Bah Kut Teh for my family and I.


ACS77
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
January 17, 2009 7:49pm

Jim & ACS77,
The long and crispy fried rolls that is eaten with Bak Kut Teh is indeed Yau Char Quay. The rolls taste so good because it is very porous, and it absorbs the essence of Bak Kut Teh like a sponge. Jim, I am very impressed with your knowledge on Malaysian food. If you are into cooking, I hope you can find some easy to prepare, instant Malaysian delicacies in your local Asian grocery outlets. You can also find some comprehensive recipes from Malaysian food websites. Good for you Sam, I hope you enjoy your consignment of Bak Kut Teh supplies.
ACS77

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 218
January 17, 2009 8:50pm

Hi Ken,


I will be playing tour guide for my friend's family of 5. Will show them around the Bay Area and then they will visit Southern Cal and Vegas by themselves.
As for Bah Kut Teh, my first one was in Old Klang Road. Don't ask me the name. This was like more than 3o years ago : ) Besides the Yau Char Quay, I also like the Foo Pok!
How is the weather in Chicago, Ken?


ACS77
Jim Joyce

Registered: July 2008
Posts: 432
January 17, 2009 10:44pm

Ken I love Malaysian food,my wife was the best cook ever,of any food,which of course has spoiled me.Unfortunately mate I am heavily into eating and disasterously into cooking.Anyone eating my food would consider the experience as lucky as getting run over by an Ambulance
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 18, 2009 2:08am

Ken, I was told that there is a very good Bak Kut Teh in Klang if you don't mind the traffic jams. This shop is just opposite the Jaya Jusco in Bukit Raja and its called Restoran Teluk Pulai. Most swear that it is the best but I've still yet to try it. Maybe we should take note ot if if hunger pangs and bak kut teh comes to mind.
Retired Falcon

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 1,168
January 18, 2009 6:38am

The very mention of Yau Char Quay makes me want to get some and dip it into black coffee. It makes a good tea-time snack. Some favourites that go with it are Harm Cheen Peng and Mah Keok.
Ken Chan

Registered: July 2008
Location: Chicago. IL, USA
Posts: 1,170
January 18, 2009 2:58pm

Joe, since you have such an exquisite taste for good food, I am sure you can 'sniff' your way around and discover some great 'makan' places.In addition to Yau Char Quay, Harm Cheen Pang and Mah Keok, the pastry shops in Chinatown also have 'Ngau Ley So', which is so called because it is shaped like a cow's tongue. The older folks gather in these pastry shops every morning to read their newspapers, debate about politics, or catch up with gossips over a cup of coffee and some pastries.


Sam, l also wear the 'tour guide' hat many times a year when friends and relatives from out of state or abroad are in Chicago. There were instances when more than one group is in town and I have to delegate some of the duties to my wife. This Saturday, a cousin from KL is flying in to spend Chinese New Year with us. She is a regular visitor and is more interested in shopping than sightseeing. Weather wise, this has been a very snowy winter so far. The average annual snowfall is about 39 inches, and we have already exceeded that amount in the 1st month of winter. Last week, a freak arctic blast known as the Alberta Clipper swoop down on us from Canada. Temperatures in the Midwest and even as south as Alabama plunged to sub-zero levels, and for days we were colder than Alaska. Milder readings have returned but no matter what, Chicago is very resilient. Life goes on, and this bustling city will never be a frozen Siberian tundra in winter.
blue grass

Registered: September 2008
Posts: 995
January 18, 2009 7:15pm

Hi Ken, glad to know that you and family are doing well despite a harsher than normal winter. Good for you! There is also little joy in Ipoh where we have had more than our fair share of rain. At this time of the year we should be entering a dry period but it is not happening. Too much rain has played havoc with the fruit harvest. Where normally we would have had a glut of durians by now, there are scarcely any being sold. Even our own rambutan tree which had produced so much flowers, is almost barren of fruit. Most of the flowers either rotted away or dropped off. The few rambutans that we have plucked are smaller than usual although still sweet.
Chinese New Year is but a week away. How are the preparations going on? The women folk must be ever so busy with baking, cooking and spring cleaning! I remember 'spring cleaning' was a big thing with my mother as well as my ma-in-law. An auspicious date had to be chosen, not any date would do! Sprigs of bamboo tied to long poles were used to sweep all corners of the house. The children could hardly contain their excitement as they would then know, it was 'Ang pow' time!
A very happy 'Kong Hee Fatt Choy' to you Ken and your loved ones. May the Ox bring Health, Wealth and Happiness to all of us!
Blue Grass.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 19, 2009 3:06am

Talking about Yau Char Quay, it is also a favourite breakfast for residents of Singapore. In the heartlands (suburban HDB flats townships, a term now commonly used), you will see the food courts in these HDB townships, people queuing up to get their Yau Char Quay and then get their favourite cuppa to dunk the Yau Char Quay into it. The Yau Char Quay in Singapore is much bigger than those you get in Ipoh or KL. They are really great and crispy....love them! Smile Only consuming them very occasionally for health reasons! Sad
Alcapone

Registered: November 2008
Location: Singapore
Posts: 10
January 19, 2009 4:16am

Hi Hokin, You spurce up my craving for fitter dough. Yes, it goes well with bak kut teh and porridge too. Sometimes, I just like it fresh from the wok and it's tasty when hot. The Taiwanese version is even larger, and they like it with soya bean. We can also find this in Singapore.
hokin

Registered: August 2008
Posts: 118
January 19, 2009 4:27am

I would like to have one too but where I am there is none to be found! Sad There is even a wiki page on these dough fritters!! under 'Youtiao'
nsubbu135
nsubbu135

Registered: July 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 17
October 19, 2009 10:53pm

Mr.Kayes
Is/Was a broad Panglima street besides Panglima lane
As my memory goes when I was 5 years old (now I am 63 year old) I recall two way parking of lorries too and chinese shops
This was my first residence as co tenent in first floor with one Rejina press (located at belfeld street). My father was working at Simedarby then
subra
nsubbu135
nsubbu135

Registered: July 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 17
April 4, 2011 7:31pm

Hallo Mr Kayes
Tiger Balm is officially available here manufactured with license
I have used the Chinese oil having purchased from Musthafa Singapore
Some persons buy and sell to local market with profit margin
Also we are not sure of originality and quality
subbu
nsubbu135
nsubbu135

Registered: July 2009
Location: Chennai
Posts: 17
April 4, 2011 7:39pm

Dear Mr Kayes
The caption given as Punglima Lane
But my memory( Could be wrong as it was 50 years od and me being 4 years old) recalls as Punglima Street with space enough for lorry parking eiether side and
space for lorry travel
Can you pl confirm
Thanks
subbu
Orange

Registered: February 2009
Posts: 3,163
April 5, 2011 4:40am

Tiger Balm is Mun Kum Yow in Cantonese. Mun (Million) Kum (Gold) Yow (Ointment). This trusted ointment is as good as million gold to the Chinese!
kayes

Registered: July 2008
Location: Penang Malaysia
Posts: 4,798
November 24, 2015 3:02pm

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